When It Comes to News, There Are Gazers and Grazers

If you’ve turned the pages of a newspaper in public to find out what’s going in the world, you may have felt just a bit out of place among all the twenty-somethings using tablets and smartphones for the same purpose. Sign up for the AARP Money Matters newsletter According to a new survey from the Pew Research Center, what you noticed is a profound generational difference in how Americans get their news. Those of us who are 50 and older, …

Dear Abby Weighs In on Older Workers Debate

The debate over older workers staying on the job longer, and crowding out younger employees, won’t go away. In a recent Dear Abby column, “Disgusted in Columbus, Ohio,” blasted older workers for hanging onto their jobs “so they can live lavish lifestyles” at the expense of younger workers who don’t advance in the workplace, or worse, get laid off. Yet as Dear Abby pointed out, many older adults stay on the job these days just to survive.  During the financial crisis and …

Workers’ Pay Raise Next Year: 3 Percent

Salaried workers can expect a slightly fatter paycheck next year, but the salary bump you get may be considerably different from what your colleague in the next cubicle takes home. Overall, workers’ base pay in most industries is expected to climb an average of 3 percent in 2014. While that may seem relatively modest, it’s actually the biggest wage hike that employers have given out since 2008, according to a report by business consultant Aon Hewitt, which surveyed 1,147 U.S. …

The Constantly Moving Target of Debt Freedom

In my line of work as a professional cheapskate, a week rarely passes when I don’t receive a money-related press release or see a news item that leaves me shaking my head about people’s attitudes and behavior when it comes to money.  Adlai E. Stevenson said it 50+ years ago, but it’s apparently all the more true today.  Stevenson said:  “There was a time when a fool and his money were soon parted, but now it seems to happen to …

Who Wants to Live to 120? Hardly Anyone

If a new medical treatment could slow aging and allow you to live to 120, would you want to? Most Americans would say, “No thanks,” according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center. The researchers wanted to know Americans’ views on aging – after all, one in five will be age 65 by 2050 – as well as the recent push for medical research and advances to extend our life expectancy. Turns out, we’re not so thrilled about …

Thin or Fiscally Fit: You Choose

Would you rather be thin or debt-free? I know, you want to be both. For those of us who are overweight and underwater, it’s a nice dilemma to mull over (beats the quandary of saving for retirement or paying for your kid’s college education). But it wasn’t a tough call for 72 percent of 2,021 Americans polled. They’d rather keep their current debt than the alternative: gain 25 pounds and owe nothing. Related: Be Debt-Free in a Year or Less Maybe …