New Year’s Resolutions? How About Two Easy Ones

What are your New Year’s resolutions for 2014? You don’t have any? Join the club. Turns out, according to a new CBS News poll, most Americans are giving up on making resolutions. Some 68 percent of Americans are skipping the annual tradition, and of those who do make resolutions, about half don’t keep them. It does depend on your age, however. Nearly half of those under 30 – those idealistic little darlings – still like to make resolutions, while those …

Don’t Rush: Long, Slow Walks Cut Stroke Risk

If a new British study is right, slow and steady wins the (health) race for older men trying to lower their

Rx for Heart Disease: Take 2 Walks and Call Me in the Morning

A major new study finds that exercise is as good – or in some cases better – than prescription drugs in protecting against future heart attacks, stroke and diabetes. The study, conducted by researchers from Harvard and Stanford universities, is among a very few trials that have directly compared an exercise regimen with medication. Researchers compared their effectiveness for patients with heart disease, heart failure and pre-type 2 diabetes, and

Are Your Streets Working for You?

America is changing politically, socially, demographically and economically – in ways that bode well for active transportation. Increasingly, we’re getting back to a nostalgic view of the street as providing the lifeblood and pulse of a neighborhood. It’s the place where shops and restaurants thrive on customer loyalty; where neighbors catch up and friends interact; where parents walk their kids to school. In essence, streets are reemerging as the fundamental context for placemaking, and it’s a change that comes just …

How Do You Know If a Town Is Right for You?

In earlier blog posts, I’ve addressed the idea of retiring in the neighborhood you’ve come to love, the one where you have established friendships and social circles. But what if your quest is to go someplace new, in the same town or even far away? My wife, Lys, and I moved more than 3,000 miles, leaving Florida for the cooler climate of the Pacific Northwest. We wanted to be in the center of innovative town making, a place where we …

Seeing Life From a Rolling Chair

It’s only been a few weeks since I joined the ranks of 1.6 million Americans who use wheelchairs, and it has already changed me. I feel helpless in some ways and useless in others. I am in a different world, downsized and looking up, dependent upon others to get me where I’m going. There is a terrible loneliness to that. I use the chair only occasionally as the effects of COPD impact my ability to breathe easily, ergo my ability …