Poll: Nearly half of adults 50+ are currently trying to lose weight

Recently, I wrote about New Year’s resolutions and that, among those 50 years and older with resolutions, 25% are working on health/fitness goals–the largest category by far. We’ve found this focus on health and fitness in a variety of other research too. For example, AARP research shows that when many people are turning 50, they set a goal to lose weight and get in shape before that big day. In an AARP  study of conversations online about 50th birthdays, losing …

7 Ways to Fight Your Sugar Addiction

For those of us with a sweet tooth – which appears to be most of the country – the newest research carries some bitter news: Americans eat way too much sugar, and it’s killing us. In one of the biggest studies to examine the issue, researchers from the government and two universities found a link between high sugar consumption and fatal heart disease. The study was published February 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The culprit, they believe, is all the sugar …

New Year’s Resolutions? How About Two Easy Ones

What are your New Year’s resolutions for 2014? You don’t have any? Join the club. Turns out, according to a new CBS News poll, most Americans are giving up on making resolutions. Some 68 percent of Americans are skipping the annual tradition, and of those who do make resolutions, about half don’t keep them. It does depend on your age, however. Nearly half of those under 30 – those idealistic little darlings – still like to make resolutions, while those …

Don’t Rush: Long, Slow Walks Cut Stroke Risk

If a new British study is right, slow and steady wins the (health) race for older men trying to lower their

Rx for Heart Disease: Take 2 Walks and Call Me in the Morning

A major new study finds that exercise is as good – or in some cases better – than prescription drugs in protecting against future heart attacks, stroke and diabetes. The study, conducted by researchers from Harvard and Stanford universities, is among a very few trials that have directly compared an exercise regimen with medication. Researchers compared their effectiveness for patients with heart disease, heart failure and pre-type 2 diabetes, and

Are Your Streets Working for You?

America is changing politically, socially, demographically and economically – in ways that bode well for active transportation. Increasingly, we’re getting back to a nostalgic view of the street as providing the lifeblood and pulse of a neighborhood. It’s the place where shops and restaurants thrive on customer loyalty; where neighbors catch up and friends interact; where parents walk their kids to school. In essence, streets are reemerging as the fundamental context for placemaking, and it’s a change that comes just …