To Reduce Diabetes Risk: Eat. Stroll. Repeat.

There used to be a tradition of taking a little walk after dinner to aid digestion. Turns out, a short walk after eating can do even more: It can help reduce the risk of diabetes in older adults by lowering blood sugar levels for hours after a meal, a new study finds. The research from George Washington University’s School of Public Health and Health Services looked at whether a 15-minute walk after each meal was better for blood sugar levels …

Indianapolis Cultural Trail: Known by Few, Used by Many

If there were an award for the most under-appreciated trail network, Indianapolis would be a contender. Home to some of the fastest race cars on earth, many Hoosiers leave their cars behind to enjoy the city’s futuristic people-mover system, or to walk and bike on what is undoubtedly one of the best trail systems in America. Earlier this year, the Indianapolis Cultural Trail opened with eight miles of great places to bike and walk. The Cultural Trail is a uniquely …

How You Can Make Your Town Safe and Walkable for All

All Sarah Clark Stuart wanted was for her family to be able to safely access the Schuylkill River Trail, just across the tracks from the Philadelphia neighborhood where she lived. But the passing of freight trains made the crossing unsafe, especially for her then-young children, and also for the many older adults who lived nearby. For them, the trail was an invaluable place to exercise or safely travel by foot or bicycle. It also built a sense of community. But …

Leg Pain When Walking? Take Aspirin, Walk More, Study Shows

People whose legs ache when they walk because of blocked leg arteries can get just as much relief — if not more — by taking a low-dose aspirin instead of Plavix and taking daily walks. Leg cramps and pain are classic symptoms of blocked or poor blood flow — officially called Peripheral Artery Disease or PAD. PAD affects some 8 million Americans, including an estimated 12 to 20 percent of those over age 65. Because those with PAD are at …

The Takeaway: Changes In Walk Precede Alzheimer’s Disease

Something in the way you move could be an early indicator of cognitive impairment. Five studies presented at an international Alzheimer’s Association conference this month show that a person’s gait becoming slower, less controlled or more variable is often a sign of concurrent problems with thinking skills such as memory, processing info or planning and carrying out activities.

Two Outstanding Doctors: Your Right and Left Legs

I first met Dr. David Sabgir, a board-certified cardiologist in Ohio, a few years ago. A small reference in Cooking Light magazine to his upstart walking program in Lewis Center, Ohio, piqued my interest. When I contacted Dr. Sabgir, I learned that every Saturday at 8:30 a.m., rain or shine, he heads out on a walk at Highbanks Metropolitan Park in Lewis Center, Ohio, with 175 to 200 patients, neighbors, friends and family members. Frustration triggered the start of Dr. …