Watergate

Richard Nixon’s Last Epithet

Posted on 08/23/2013 by | In Other News . . . | Comments

Bulletin Today | PoliticsAs the Senate Watergate Committee was turning up the heat on President Richard M. Nixon and his closest associates in 1973, chairman Sam Ervin, a North Carolina Democrat, became something of a national folk hero. At his death in 1985, one newspaper remembered him as “a latter-day Diogenes bent on finding the truth in an era of Watergate lies.” But to Nixon, the courtly, 76-year-old Ervin was something else altogether. “The president of the United States can’t be kicked around …

Being ‘Nixonian’ Ain’t What It Used to Be

Posted on 04/11/2013 by | Who's News | Comments

Bulletin Today | PoliticsSenate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is plenty upset. The leak of a surreptitious recording of one of his reelection campaign’s strategy sessions captures McConnell and his aides discussing possible attacks on actress Ashley Judd — at the time a potential Democratic opponent — over her past struggles with depression and religious views. Although Mother Jones magazine’s David Corn, who obtained the scoop, hasn’t revealed the source, McConnell accused Democrats of bugging his campaign headquarters. “A quite Nixonian move,” is …

Robert Bork: 6 Facts About the Would-Be Supreme Court Justice

Posted on 12/19/2012 by | Who's News | Comments

LegacyRobert H. Bork, who died on Dec. 19 at age 85 in Arlington, Va., is most famous for what he didn’t do: sit on the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1987, President Ronald Reagan nominated Bork, a former solicitor general in the Nixon administration and a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, to replace Justice Lewis Powell on the nation’s highest court. The announcement promptly triggered a firestorm of opposition, and Bork’s bruising five-day-long nomination hearing …

Is Sheldon Adelson a Modern Version of W. Clement Stone?

Posted on 06/29/2012 by | Politics | Comments

Bulletin Today | PoliticsIn striking down major portions of federal campaign finance law  in 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court opened the floodgates for unlimited “independent” expenditures on behalf of presidential candidates. As long as the groups doing the spending — and the donors that bankroll them — don’t directly coordinate their efforts with the candidates they’re backing, the Court said, the sky’s the limit. The result has been a record-shattering flood of TV and radio commercials, Internet ads, robocalls and other persuasive efforts …