7 Moments Boomers Will Always Remember

Seven enduring memories from our yearlong ‘Boomer History’ project: Promised a T-shirt and a dollar for showing up, 5,000 fans greet the Beatles at New York’s JFK International Airport on Feb. 7, 1964. The following year, on Aug. 15, “arena rock” is born when a concert by the Fab Four draws more than 55,000 fans to Shea Stadium in Queens, N.Y. But nothing lasts forever. Preparing to release a solo album in April 1970, Paul McCartney says that the Beatles are finished. On March 7, 1965, …

This Week in Boomer History: Kwanzaa … Beatlemania … ‘Howdy Doody’

Notable events from our shared experience A California professor of African studies leads the first celebration of Kwanzaa, on Dec. 26, 1966. Rooted in the Black Power movement, Maulana Karenga seeks to connect black Americans with traditional African harvest rituals and give young people an introduction to the continent’s culture during what becomes an annual weeklong observance. Signaling the end of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Mikhail Gorbachev resigns as general secretary Dec. 25, 1991, and hands over the nation’s nuclear launch codes to Russian President Boris Yeltsin. …

This Week in Boomer History: Tiny Tim … Impeachment

Noteworthy events from our shared experience The U.S. House of Representatives impeaches President Bill Clinton on Dec. 19, 1998. The articles of impeachment accuse Clinton of lying to a grand jury about his relationships with Paula Jones and Monica Lewinsky and hiding evidence in the Jones case. On Feb. 12, 1999, the Senate acquits Clinton of both charges. The American Psychiatric Association board of directors votes 13-0 on Dec. 15, 1973, to remove homosexuality from its official catalog of psychiatric disorders. The APA membership backs the decision four months later. >> Get …

This Week in Boomer History: Otis Redding … John Lennon

Noteworthy events from our shared experience Otis Redding dies at age 26 when his private plane crashes near Madison, Wis., on Dec. 10, 1967. His song “(Sittin’ on) The Dock of the Bay,” recorded three days earlier, becomes the first song released posthumously to reach No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 100. Candy tycoon Robert Welch Jr. founds the anticommunist John Birch Society on Dec. 9, 1958. Named after an intelligence officer (and Baptist missionary) killed in China at the close of World War …

This Week in Boomer History: ‘Million Dollar Quartet’ … Rosa Parks

Notable events from our shared experience Rockabilly guitarist and singer Carl Perkins (“Blue Suede Shoes”) is at Sun Studios in Memphis on Dec. 4, 1956, to record with pianist Jerry Lee Lewis (“Great Balls of Fire”). When Elvis Presley (at left) and Johnny Cash drop in, the four musicians — the “Million Dollar Quartet,” a Memphis paper dubs them — start a jam session for the ages. Recordings of 46 (mostly incomplete) songs from the session don’t begin to appear until …

This Week in Boomer History: ‘Thriller’ … Iran-Contra

Notable events from our shared experience Atari releases Pong, the first commercially successful video game, on Nov. 29, 1972. Crude by today’s standards, the virtual table tennis game launches an industry — one with annual revenue forecast to pass $100 billion in 2018.   After takeoff of Northwest Orient Flight 305 from Portland, Ore., to Seattle on Nov. 24, 1971, a man claiming to have a bomb demands a $200,000 ransom and four parachutes. The plane picks up the loot in …