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This Week in Boomer History: Test Tube Baby … Kitchen Debate … ADA

Posted on 07/20/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

PoliticsNoteworthy events from our common experience President George H.W. Bush signs the Americans with Disabilities Act into law on July 26, 1990. Bob Dylan straps on his electric guitar and plugs in his amplifier at the Newport (R.I.) Folk Festival on July 25, 1965. The crowd boos (and cheers) him; purists are furious. >> Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter  Born July 25, 1978, Louise Joy Brown is the world’s first “test tube baby,” though she’d more accurately be …

This Week in Boomer History: Men on the Moon … Chappaquiddick … Malaise

Posted on 07/13/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

PoliticsNotable events from our shared experience Edward M. Kennedy drives off a bridge after a party on Chappaquiddick Island, Mass., on July 18, 1969. Kennedy escapes the submerged car, but Mary Jo Kopechne, a former campaign aide to Robert Kennedy, dies. Two semiconductor pioneers and a pair of venture capitalists found chip maker NM Electronics on July 18, 1968. It soon changes its name to Intel. Gladys Knight, age 8, appears on the TV show Ted Mack’s Original Amateur Hour …

This Week in Boomer History: Miranda Warning … Live Aid … NYC Blackout

Posted on 07/6/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

PoliticsNotable events from our shared experience Gloria Steinem delivers an “Address to the Women of America,” considered by many one of the century’s great speeches, on July 10, 1971. In it, she says: “Sex and race, because they are easy, visible differences, have been the primary ways of organizing human beings into superior and inferior groups, and into the cheap labor on which this system still depends. We are talking about a society in which there will be no roles …

This Week in Boomer History: Remember the Bicentennial?

Posted on 06/29/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

PoliticsNotable events from our shared experience On July 3, 1971, Jim Morrison of the Doors joins Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix as rock icons who die at age 27. Sam Walton and his brother, Bud, open the first Walmart store (called Wal-Mart Discount City) in Rogers, Ark., on July 2, 1962. Today, the company is the world’s largest public corporation and, with over 2 million employees, the world’s largest private employer. Ernest Hemingway, 61, shoots himself to death July 2, 1961, at his home in Ketchum, …

This Week in Boomer History: Stonewall … Sotomayor … Pong

Posted on 06/22/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

Bulletin TodayNotable events from our shared experience Sonia Sotomayor is born June 25, 1954 in Bronx, New York. In 2009, she becomes the first Hispanic justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Smokey Robinson and the Miracles release “The Tracks of My Tears” on June 23, 1965; the song later resurfaces on the soundtrack of the films The Big Chill (1983) and Platoon (1986). On June 25, 1950, North Korea invades South Korea. In three years of battle, more than 36,000 American …

This Week in Boomer History: Sally Ride … Monterey Pop … Civil Rights

Posted on 06/15/2014 by |News, Culture, Sights and Sounds | Comments

Bulletin TodayNotable events from our shared experience Astronaut Sally K. Ride becomes the first American woman in space on June 18, 1983. Passionately devoted to teaching science, technology, engineering and math to girls, she starts Sally Ride Science in 2001. Singer-actress Judy Garland dies at age 47 on June 22, 1969. Fred Astaire once called the star of The Wizard of Oz “the greatest entertainer who ever lived.” >> Sign up for the AARP Advocacy Newsletter President Richard Nixon signs a …