This Week in Boomer History: Tiny Tim … Impeachment

Noteworthy events from our shared experience The U.S. House of Representatives impeaches President Bill Clinton on Dec. 19, 1998. The articles of impeachment accuse Clinton of lying to a grand jury about his relationships with Paula Jones and Monica Lewinsky and hiding evidence in the Jones case. On Feb. 12, 1999, the Senate acquits Clinton of both charges. The American Psychiatric Association board of directors votes 13-0 on Dec. 15, 1973, to remove homosexuality from its official catalog of psychiatric disorders. The APA membership backs the decision four months later. >> Get …

This Week in Boomer History: Otis Redding … John Lennon

Noteworthy events from our shared experience Otis Redding dies at age 26 when his private plane crashes near Madison, Wis., on Dec. 10, 1967. His song “(Sittin’ on) The Dock of the Bay,” recorded three days earlier, becomes the first song released posthumously to reach No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 100. Candy tycoon Robert Welch Jr. founds the anticommunist John Birch Society on Dec. 9, 1958. Named after an intelligence officer (and Baptist missionary) killed in China at the close of World War …

This Week in Boomer History: ‘Million Dollar Quartet’ … Rosa Parks

Notable events from our shared experience Rockabilly guitarist and singer Carl Perkins (“Blue Suede Shoes”) is at Sun Studios in Memphis on Dec. 4, 1956, to record with pianist Jerry Lee Lewis (“Great Balls of Fire”). When Elvis Presley (at left) and Johnny Cash drop in, the four musicians — the “Million Dollar Quartet,” a Memphis paper dubs them — start a jam session for the ages. Recordings of 46 (mostly incomplete) songs from the session don’t begin to appear until …

This Week in Boomer History: ‘Thriller’ … Iran-Contra

Notable events from our shared experience Atari releases Pong, the first commercially successful video game, on Nov. 29, 1972. Crude by today’s standards, the virtual table tennis game launches an industry — one with annual revenue forecast to pass $100 billion in 2018.   After takeoff of Northwest Orient Flight 305 from Portland, Ore., to Seattle on Nov. 24, 1971, a man claiming to have a bomb demands a $200,000 ransom and four parachutes. The plane picks up the loot in …

This Week in Boomer History: Jonestown … ‘White Album’ … JFK

Notable events from our shared experience After followers of cult leader Jim Jones ambush an investigative delegation, killing five (Rep. Leo Ryan, left, among them), more than 900 inhabitants of the cult’s Jonestown settlement in Guyana die in a mass suicide/murder on Nov. 18, 1978. On Nov. 18, 1966, American Roman Catholic bishops declare an end to meatless Fridays, except during Lent. That’s after the practice has given rise to countless fish lunches in school cafeterias and the Filet-O-Fish at McDonald’s. >> 10 Essential …

This Week in Boomer History: ‘Sesame Street’ … ‘Catch-22’

Notable events from our shared experience Published Nov. 10, 1961, Joseph Heller’s antiwar novel Catch-22 over the years spawns a catchphrase for paradoxical futility. Alan Arkin, Martin Balsam, Richard Benjamin and Art Garfunkel star in a 1970 movie version. Carl Stokes becomes the first black mayor of a major American city when he takes the reins in Cleveland on Nov. 13, 1967. After two terms, he becomes New York City’s first African American TV news anchorman in 1972. >> 10 Essential Boomer Books On Nov. 10, …