Not Everyone Is Living Longer

When it is unveiled in the coming weeks, the Social Security Trustees report will no doubt prompt the program’s critics to call for change, as it does each year. And one of their suggestions will likely be to raise the age of eligibility for Social Security and Medicare benefits. It sounds so reasonable. Isn’t everybody living longer? Unfortunately, the answer is no. >> Sign up for the AARP Advocacy Newsletter The truth is that gains in life expectancy are not …

11 Things We Didn’t Know Last Week

News, discoveries and fun …   1. Dolphins are 10 times stronger than the fittest humans. (Learn more at Discovery) 2. A spandex suit that combats slipped disks in astronauts might also help people on Earth with lower-back problems. (Learn more at Mashable) (hat tip to Mike Kulick) 3. One percent of the world’s population controls half the wealth. (Learn more at NPR) 4. The Peace Corp’s oldest volunteer, 80, is winding up her assignment in South Africa. (Learn more at AARP) …

The Secret Millionaire Twins

Kathleen and Robert Magowan of Simsbury, Conn., never attracted much attention during their lifetimes. The twin siblings, born in New York, lived for a time in Bolivia and Alaska - their father was an explosives manufacturing executive – before settling in Connecticut in 1942. Neither Kathleen, an elementary schoolteacher, nor Robert, who served in the military in World War II and then became an agent for Prudential insurance, ever married. In later years they lived together as near recluses in a …

Learn More + Earn More = Live Longer?

How long you live has a lot to do with income and education. That’s the message from experts who testified on Nov. 20 at a U.S. Senate hearing on “Dying Young: Why Your Social and Economic Status May Be a Death Sentence in America.” >> Sign up for the AARP Money newsletter. As Steven Woolf, M.D., the director of the Center on Society and Health at Virginia Commonwealth University, put it, “the lower people’s income, the earlier they die and …

The Forbes 400 – America’s Richest, by Generation

Forbes magazine has just released its Forbes 400 ranking of the richest people in the United States, and within it, there’s an intriguing message: If you want to be really, really, really wealthy, it’s going to take a while, and you should plan on working past the typical U.S. retirement age of 61. Only 38 of the 400 – who had to amass a fortune of at least $1.3 billion to qualify – are under age 50, and the average …

Investing in 2012: Health is Wealth

Consumer credit card debt soared in the last quarter of 2011, climbing to nearly $16,000 per family. In running up this tab, consumers seem to have resumed the habit of borrowing from tomorrow’s wealth to meet today’s wants and desires. According to economists who note the anemic economic recovery, consumer spending is outpacing reality. Good-paying jobs with benefits are still scarce, real estate has yet to recover its former value and savings are showing modest returns. At the same time, two-thirds …