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What Health Apps Tell Outsiders About You

Posted on 05/9/2014 by |Senior Editor, Money Team | Comments

Bulletin Today | Personal HealthHundreds of health applications these days can track our weight, steps, caloric intake, blood pressure — and even our friends’ workouts at the gym. And those diagnosed with an ailment can go online to get answers to health questions or share their stories with others suffering from the same illness. Sure, this can be useful for consumers seeking to take control of their health. These new outlets, however, raise other questions: Who else is looking at our medical information? And …

‘Overstock’ Name Is Hot Holiday Hoax

Posted on 12/5/2013 by |AARP Blog Author | Comments

Bulletin Today | Money & SavingsAmong the most common holiday shopping cons is cybersquatting, when scammers steal or slightly alter the name or website address of a well-known company to engage in rip-offs including identity theft, credit card fraud and sale of counterfeit goods. This holiday season, “Overstock” is certainly not being underutilized by scammers. The Better Business Bureau warns of a “noticeable trend” of phony websites using the word “overstock” somewhere in their domain name, “hoping to fool consumers into thinking they are shopping …

WebTV: The Internet Revolution That Wasn’t

Posted on 07/10/2013 by |Who's News | Comments

Bulletin Today | Technology  Back in the mid-1990s, when PCs cost thousands of dollars and required a fair amount of technological savvy to set up and operate, WebTV seemed like the next big thing: an easier, cheaper ($300) way to get online and experience the still-newfangled wonders of the World Wide Web. “After spending a couple of weeks using WebTV,” BusinessWeek technology columnist Stephen H. Wildstrom gushed in 1996, “I think we may now have the product that could turn the World Wide Web …

What’s Congress Up To? How You Can Find Out

Posted on 06/13/2013 by |Washington Watch | Comments

Bulletin Today | PoliticsAmericans rate Congress below most scourges, polls regularly show. But does the public actually know what Congress is doing? Only a small percentage of legislation makes it to the Senate and House floors, where insomniacs can stay glued to the proceedings on C-SPAN. But these days, it’s a lot easier than it used to be to track bills of interest through the legislative process. The granddaddy of legislative access is named, fittingly, after the guy who created the Library of …