Livable Communities

Grandmother near map with hospital shown purple
According to AARP Public Policy Institute research, more than 100 million Americans do not drive. Yet our transportation systems are still built primarily around individual car ownership. Ride-hailing services, like Lyft, along with public transportation systems are beginning to work together to reimagine how our future transportation infrastructure can improve quality of life for people of every age and background.
family-entering-metro-station.jpg
A tragic subway death in New York City has drawn public attention to the need for accessible transportation in all communities
While innovations in transportation tend to be viewed as a trend unique to urban communities and settings, new technologies are now enabling service providers to capitalize on a previously untapped market: rural communities. With a unique set of challenges and opportunities—and enabled by today’s technology—these rural markets allow transportation service providers to rethink the kinds of services they provide, how to scale those services, and how to make them more accessible. That movement toward innovation in rural markets needs to grow.
From the 2018 AARP National Livable Communities Conference
Webinar Date: February 13, 2019
At the United States Conference of Mayors winter meeting on January 24, a panel of mayors discussed the important role that voters age 50 or older play in local elections and how communities can best engage older adults.
Please visit the AARP.org/Livable page "Webinar: Missing Middle Housing" for the presentation slides and additional information about presenter Daniel Parolek and this webinar from May 31, 2018.
2018 LCA Summit room pic
One of the most exciting developments in the livable communities movement is the increasing collaboration between aging professionals and planners—professionals who shape the form and function of future communities. Some incredible progress was made on this front at the 2018 Livable Communities for All Ages (LCA) Summit in San Francisco March 29.
The first-ever  AARP Community Challenge resulted in a highly competitive process to select 88 grantees committed to improving the quality of life for people of all ages. The winners implemented "quick action" programs, projects and changes in their communities. For a complete list of winners, visit the  AARP Community Challenge home page.
Hosted in Dallas, the 2017 AARP Livable Communities National Conference was an opportunity for elected officials, planning professionals, local leaders and community advocates from throughout the nation to share ideas, best practices and solutions for making towns, cities and communities more livable for people of all ages.