AARP Cheat Sheet: Monday, November 15


("How To Wrap a Cat for Christmas"... oh yeah, it's that time.)
Text4doctor: "When District-based Voxiva released a free text message service in February sending prenatal health advice to expectant mothers, the technology firm hoped it would be a successful example of mobile health in the United States. Nine months later, they say it has delivered." Puns aside, mobile health services have big implications for many of us phone-tied - not to mention much of the developing world, for whom a phone is often their only broadband access.
"... In an era when smoking has become taboo in the rest of the country, smokers seem downright liberated when they step onto the Las Vegas Strip: Finally, there is someplace where they have nothing to be ashamed of as they romp through their bastion of freedom."
Single? CNBC has tips for you - well, not you, your bank account: "For younger single seniors, inflation is your biggest risk," says advisor Jonathan DeYoe. "It eats away at buying power every single year and you don't even see it. If you don't manage for inflation, you end up running out of money."
AP: Doctors brace for big possible Medicare cuts:"Breast cancer surgeon Kathryn Wagner has posted a warning in her waiting room about a different sort of risk to patients' health: She'll stop taking new Medicare cases if Congress allows looming cuts in doctors' pay to go through. ...'My frustration level is at a nine or 10 right now,' said Wagner, who practices in San Antonio. "I am exceptionally exhausted with these annual and biannual threats to cut my reimbursement by drastic amounts. As a business person, I can't budget at all because I have no idea how much money is going to come in. Medicine is a business. Private practice is a business."
Ruby Bridges, the first black student to attend an all-white elementary school in the South: "It was not until decades later that I fully understood how much my first-grade year shaped my entire life. And I had that realization, of all places, at William Frantz. I had not given much thought to the events of my childhood until my youngest brother passed away in 1993 and I began looking after his daughters. They happened to be students at William Frantz, and I began volunteering there as a parent liaison. At that difficult time in my life, I felt I had been brought back in touch with my past for some greater cause." Read the whole thing.

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