2016 election

“The polls got it wrong.” We hear this a lot when election outcomes don’t match pre-vote predictions.  But what about the exit polls – the Election Day surveys that pollsters and pundits use to tell us what really happened? Turns out, there is a lot those tallies miss – particularly when it comes to older voters.
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The outcome of the 2016 presidential election took many people by surprise. I’ve spent a fair amount of time listening to experts analyze the election results over the past week. There are almost as many explanations as there are pundits . . . the rural vote came out in droves for President-elect Trump; Secretary Clinton didn’t turn out the “Obama Coalition”; votes to third-party candidates swung states one way or the other. All of those analyses are valid to a certain extent, but one thing that hasn’t been talked about is the largest swath of voters (the 50-plus) and how they broke heavily for Donald Trump.
Modified road signs on Election and Fraud
In this homestretch to the Nov. 8 elections, expect a hard push from scammers posing as pollsters, political party staffers or PAC officials in tongue-twisting ploys to pilfer your money and identity.
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Today, Social Security turns 81 years old.
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AARP Opens Field Offices in Seven States
Updated Take a Stand SS options-web-mar2.16-02
It’s time to set the record straight on Donald Trump and Social Security. The leading Republican candidate has yet to come out with a real plan, and the clock is ticking.
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It’s a long road to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, but the 2016 election has begun. As I sit here after the final totals are being tallied for South Carolina and Nevada, I thought I would share a couple of insights that I’ve learned coming out of the first couple of caucuses and primaries.
Caucusgoers check-in before casting their vote for a Democratic presidential candidate ahead of the Nevada Democratic presidential caucus at Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Today voters weigh in on the Democratic battle between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders competing in the Nevada caucuses with Clinton believed to have the advantage in the western state because of its heavily Hispanic electorate, but some recent polls show the race tied.
Voters age 45-plus bolstered winners Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in the Feb. 20 presidential nominating contests in Nevada and South Carolina.
News outlets and early Presidential primary and caucus states have taken notice of AARP’s Take a Stand campaign announced last week.  "We're asking candidates who are running for the highest office to take a stand for how they will update Social Security," said Todd Fahey, state director at AARP New Hampshire, in a Public News Service article.
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