Nombran a Jo Ann Jenkins directora ejecutiva de AARP

In English | AARP anunció hoy que Jo Ann Jenkins fue nombrada directora ejecutiva de la asociación. Tomará las riendas de la organización de 37 millones de socios en septiembre, reemplazando al actual director ejecutivo, A. Barry Rand. “Jo Ann es una lí­der experimentada e innovadora”, expresó la presidenta de la Junta Directiva de AARP, Gail Aldrich, durante el anuncio. “Tiene una pasión evidente por AARP y adopta plenamente la misión social. Jo Ann es una dirigente inspiradora que involucra activamente …

AARP Will Work With President, Congress for Secure Future

The president’s speech tonight addressed issues AARP has been working on since long before President Lyndon Johnson’s war on poverty began over 50 years ago. Social Security and Medicare have helped make a difference by protecting the middle class and keeping millions out of poverty, but many families and Americans of all ages continue to struggle. As we look toward this season of new budget proposals, we also urge the president and Congress to fight for responsible solutions to strengthen …

Fulfilling Mandela’s Legacy

The world lost one of its most courageous and righteous leaders yesterday with the passing of Nelson Mandela. Mandela, who was imprisoned for fighting against Apartheid in South Africa only to later become that country’s first elected president once Apartheid ended, dedicated his life to fighting for social justice and economic equality. My wife and I had the opportunity to meet Madiba on a trip to South Africa in 1994.  As we ate lunch together, I could not help but …

The Takeaway: AARP CEO Addresses Debt Committee; New Federal Office Focuses on Senior Scams

AARP CEO A. Barry Rand sent a letter yesterday to the debt Super Committee asking the 12-member panel not to include Social Security or Medicare benefit cuts in its plans. And the newly-created Office of Older Americans, within the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, will focus on stopping the financial abuse of older adults. Regulators say financial fraud costs older Americans about $3 billion a year.