aarp driver safety

A few months ago, I wrote a blog about the vital role that transportation options play in what we at AARP call “livable communities” – great places to live for people of all ages. Being able to get around is critical to earn a living, raise a family, contribute and stay connected to your community and enjoy life. And, having alternatives to getting behind the wheel of your own car is particularly important for older adults who want to stay in their homes and communities as they age.
Last week, AARP hosted an event with POLITICO at the Detroit Auto Show. The topic: Driverless cars and the Future of Mobility. Now, if you’re wondering why AARP sponsored a panel that sounds more like the Jetsons than the Golden Girls . . . the answer is pretty simple. Having safe, affordable transportation options is essential to live independently, whatever your age. And, since driverless cars are coming sooner than you might think, AARP is working to make sure that these cars of the future meet the needs and concerns of older adults.
ADS_BHM_COUPLE_FB-post
Black History Month is celebrated throughout February to honor many mission-driven individuals who made or are making lasting contributions to the United States.
Modern Roundabouts
Really, it is. So long as the circle you're driving in is a modern roundabout.
It's probably been quite a few years since you first learned to drive and tested for your driver's license. Since then, cars, traffic and technology have changed, and so have you. Distractions from cellphones, talking to passengers and even sometimes grooming yourself may be activities that put you and your family at risk.
I recently appeared on CBS This Morning and NBC Nightly News to discuss having conversations with older loved ones about driving. I received many comments and questions about this hot topic. So many of us are dealing with this issue with our parents. In response to these questions and in follow up to my post about my conversations with my Dad about his driving, here are a few tips about how to talk with your older loved ones about this touchy subject.
road
Dad was "The Man" behind the wheel. From his first Model T that he and his college buddies fixed up in the 1940s to the "ooze-mobile," which I used to call his big white Oldsmobile that hit the pavement like butter, he enjoyed almost 80 years of driving. He was like a race car driver when he whipped around the hills of Athens County, Ohio in our family Chevy Corvair.
Search AARP Blogs