AARP Livable Communities

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A tragic subway death in New York City has drawn public attention to the need for accessible transportation in all communities
From the 2018 AARP National Livable Communities Conference
At the United States Conference of Mayors winter meeting on January 24, a panel of mayors discussed the important role that voters age 50 or older play in local elections and how communities can best engage older adults.
With already-available technology, every provider of door-to-door transportation service become linked
Think for a moment about everything you do in a typical week . . . going to work or school or volunteering, visiting friends and family, getting to a doctor’s appointment or the grocery store, grabbing a bite to eat, catching a movie . . . and you’ll understand why safe, affordable transportation options are a key component of what we at AARP call “livable communities” – great places to live for people of all ages. Day-to-day mobility is critical to earn a living, raise a family, contribute to your community, and, really, enjoy life.
The first-ever  AARP Community Challenge resulted in a highly competitive process to select 88 grantees committed to improving the quality of life for people of all ages. The winners implemented "quick action" programs, projects and changes in their communities. For a complete list of winners, visit the  AARP Community Challenge home page.
Rural transportation photo
Most of us take our mobility for granted. We grab our keys and head out to work, buy groceries, and shuttle our kids to movies and soccer practice—all without a second thought. But for the one-third of Americans who don’t drive and many others who lack access to a working vehicle, transportation options don’t come easy—especially in rural America, where transportation has long been a seemingly intractable problem.
The deadline is July 15, 2017!
In a statement today following the release of the White House proposed budget, AARP Chief Advocacy and Engagement Officer Nancy LeaMond opposed cuts that would harm American families:
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In 1961, AARP’s founder, Ethel Andrus, presented President Dwight Eisenhower with a version of Freedom House. The scale model of a uniquely designed home contained
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