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Every person, regardless of age, can participate in creating a livable community. According to a newly published report from Generations United and the Eisner Foundation, opportunities that bring different generations together—even the tougher ones involving “tack[ling] critical problems” benefit the entire community.
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Do you love the theater but rarely go because you can’t understand the dialogue or lyrics?
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The Sun Is Setting on the Humble Doorknob. That's the Vancouver Sun headline describing the city's new building code, which will soon outlaw twisty doorknobs  - and traditional faucet handles, too - in new construction. The paper takes the positive view that, far from being banished, doorknobs are being "legislatively upgraded to levers more conducive to the arthritic, gnarled or weakened hands we earn with age."
Tips and tools from Amy Goyer for aging at home with the help of technology.
Some call it the "bonus years," others call it a challenge.  Either way, we're living longer lives (in 1900, the average life expectancy was about 47...now it's about 78) and more than ever we want to remain active, healthy and most importantly independent . And for most, that means one thing: AARP research indicates 9 out of 10 people want to stay in their own homes as they age. With retirement lasting as much as 20, 30 or even 40 years for some, how will we pull off this lofty goal?
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