aging parents

Family caregivers provide $470M in unpaid care
Last week, U.S. Sens. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa), Michael Bennet (D-Colo.), Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Reps. Tom Reed (R-N.Y.) and Linda Sánchez (D-Calif.) introduced the bipartisan Credit for Caring Act (S. 1151/H.R. 2505) and AARP endorsed the legislation. The bill would help support America’s family caregivers by offering a federal tax credit for those who qualify.
Amy Goyer describes her Dad's struggle with Alzheimer's and hearing loss and the solution she found for him.
When Dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, I knew he would need all of his senses to help interpret the world around him and balance his changing cognitive abilities. But he has hearing impairment and limited vision (glaucoma plus visual-processing problems associated with Alzheimer’s). Even though there is only so much I can do about the visual issues, I assumed  hearing aids would solve his auditory problems. I was wrong. The good news is that we eventually discovered a surprisingly simple solution.
Amy Goyer describes the joy of unexpected Christmas connection with her Dad who has Alzheimer's disease.
The way  Alzheimer’s disease has ravaged my dad’s capabilities is especially hard to bear during holidays. I wish he could more fully participate in and enjoy our family traditions. So often it seems that he just doesn’t understand, and the meaning is lost for him. Recently, though, he gave me my most unexpected and treasured Christmas gifts ... and taught me invaluable lessons at the same time.
Two Elk Locking Horns
Located in upstate New York, Oneonta gets dumped with 75 inches of snow annually. After most snowfalls, longtime resident Lois shoveled her sidewalk — even into her 80s — although she didn't need to go anywhere and her family begged her to stop.
AARP & Ad Council unveil new PSAs in Caregiver Assistance Campaign & New poll on holiday stress.
November is National Family Caregivers Month, and AARP has teamed up with the Ad Council in a campaign that includes the results of a new caregiving poll as well as a series of powerful public service ads highlighting the changing roles of family caregivers.
military caregivers
The family members who provide care for the nation's  wounded veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars need more support than they're getting, says a  study of military caregivers released today by the  RAND Corporation. The largest-ever survey of more than 1,000 military caregivers found that 25 percent are soldiers' parents, many of whom are growing older themselves and who will not always be up to the task .
aging family caregivers worry about who will care for their young adult children with special needs
Most of us think about taking care of our aging parents or spouse, not our kids. But there are more than 11 million Americans currently providing care for a family member between the ages of 18 and 49. Many worry deeply about their loved one's future should something unexpectedly happen to them or their spouse.
Study examines sibling relationships and gratitude and the effect on caregiver health.
Whether you've had a lifelong sibling rivalry or been the best of friends, sibling relationships can be very difficult to navigate when caring for an aging parent . I am in contact with many family caregivers, and I often hear about conflict between siblings around caregiving decisions and responsibilities. Some are at such odds that they either don't communicate or have a great deal of trouble doing so. Others say that a simple expression of appreciation would go a long way in easing the sibling tension.
Amy Goyer describes her remarkable Mom who recently passed at age 87.
It is with an impossibly heavy heart that I write this post. Patricia Ann Stutz Goyer, passed on Oct. 11 after a brief and sudden illness. To many she was friend, mentor, teacher, director, aunt, sister, wife ... to me she was Mom, and she has been the inspiration for so much of my work and writing over the past four years.
Older Persons Week launch, 29 September 2013
If you've heard that being a family caregiver can diminish your life expectancy, the results of a new  report from Johns Hopkins University should make you relax. It turns out that caring for a chronically ill or disabled family member can, in fact, extend a caregiver's life.
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