Alaska

AK maos
The Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) now under consideration in the Senate would drastically alter Alaska’s Medicaid program. The proposed Senate bill would change the way the federal government currently funds Medicaid by limiting federal funding and shifting cost over time to both states and Medicaid enrollees. The BCRA would subject older adults, adults with disabilities, Medicaid expansion adults, and non-disabled children under age 19 to mandatory per enrollee caps beginning in 2020. State Medicaid programs would have the option to choose between block grants and per enrollee caps for non-elderly, non-disabled, non-expansion adults.
Mary
In August of 2014, Mary’s mother Eartha was discharged from the hospital after a short stay — an event that would have lasting consequences. When Mary arrived at the hospital that day, Eartha was ready to go, dressed and sitting in a wheelchair with a list of medications on her lap.  Never given instructions on her mother’s new prescriptions, Mary missed out on a key piece of information — one of the medications was only meant to be given for a very short time. This was discovered months later, but it was too late. Eartha’s kidneys had been damaged irreversibly by the medication and were only working at 10 percent. Mary was given the choice to start her mother on dialysis or begin hospice care.
charity
In preparing Mom’s medication, my 90-year-old Pop would fill a syringe using the light of the kitchen window to see if the dosage was correct. He set up the nebulizer on a table with handwritten step-by-step instructions to remind him how to operate it. Today, millions of family caregivers like Pop perform complex medical tasks that at one time would have been administered only by medical professionals.
signing-for-blog
Today I have great news to share: Gov. Steve Bullock has signed the Montana Health and Economic Livelihood Partnership (HELP) Act into law, giving 70,000 hardworking Montanans access to affordable health coverage. Until now, tens of thousands who had lost their jobs or were struggling in jobs without health benefits had no access to affordable healthcare — Michele was one of them.
facebook.png
For five years Michele from Montana, didn’t have access to affordable health care. She didn’t go to the doctor because she couldn’t afford it; this scared her. When health care laws began to change, Michele began to dream about what it would be like to have health coverage again, and how she would take better care of herself. But when many others gained access to affordable care last year, Michele did not. Instead, she was one of millions of hard-working Americans who fell into the new coverage gap.
Campaign Button - Elections 2014 Logo Symbol
Older voters continue to lean Republican in this year's Senate races, a new survey shows, but there have been significant shifts in seven battleground states from a comparable survey by the same organizations nearly two months ago. Overall, Republicans are on the cusp of gaining the six seats they need to take control of the Senate in the Nov. 4 election, shows the survey, conducted by YouGov of Palo Alto, Calif., for the New York Times/CBS News Battleground Tracker.
Campaign Button - Elections 2014 Logo Symbol
Social Security has become a hot issue in the Alaska Senate race, one of the battleground contests that will determine which political party controls the Senate.
150684214
Es difí­cil darse ciertos lujos y comodidades cuando se tiene un ingreso fijo, mucho más si eres retirado y tus ganancias han disminuido. Es por eso que algunos de los lugares más lindos y vibrantes de Estados Unidos también se tornan en unos de los menos asequibles, por no decir 'prohibidos', para los jubilados.
800-sarah-palin-turns-50-aarp
Since she burst onto the national scene as a vice presidential candidate in 2008, former Alaska governor, political commentator, bestselling author, social media maven and reality show host Sarah Palin has remained in the spotlight.
Wˆ"
This week, Health Insurance Marketplaces opened in states across the country.  It's true: Many more Americans will now have access to affordable health care.  But, other hard-working people, who live in states that have not yet committed to expanding Medicaid, will fall into a new coverage gap.
Search AARP Blogs