Alzheimer's disease

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Something in the way you move could be an early indicator of cognitive impairment. Five studies presented at an international Alzheimer's Association conference this month show that a person's gait becoming slower, less controlled or more variable is often a sign of concurrent problems with thinking skills such as memory, processing info or planning and carrying out activities.
Football
Recently, the New York Times ran another in their series of articles about concussions and football players. Written by George Vecsey, this piece focused on a college football player, Derek Owens, who has joined with other varsity players - three football players and one soccer goalie - in a class action suit that claims the NCAA has been negligent regarding awareness and treatment of brain injuries to athletes.
AIDS Quilt
In 1986, when I was writing on the sitcom "Designing Women," the brilliant creator of the show, Linda Bloodworth Thomason, and I found out on the same week that both of our mothers had a fatal disease. Linda's mother had acquired AIDS from a transfusion; my mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. Within six months Linda's mother had passed; my mom died five years later.
Trish
Every other Thursday, we have Trish Vradenburg as our special guest blogger covering Alzheimer's issues. Trish is a playwright, author, television writer, and Alzheimer's disease advocate. She and her husband, George, founded UsAgainstAlzheimer's with the goal of finding a cure or treatment for Alzheimer's by the year 2020. She brings her legendary humor and wit to the devastating realities of Alzheimer's, and we're excited to have her share with us here.
couple dancing
Would you like to live to 100?  Take Dr. Perls' test.
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Every other Thursday, we have Trish Vradenburg as our special guest blogger covering Alzh e imer's issues. Trish is a playwright, author, television writer, and Alzheimer's disease advocate. She and her husband, George, founded UsAgainstAlzheimer's with the goal of finding a cure or treatment for Al zheimer's by the year 2020. She brings her legendary humor and wit to the devastating realities of Alzheimer's, and we're excited to have her share with us here.
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Great news - no one died today from Alzheimer's... or yesterday... or this whole week... or even the whole month.  In fact, Alzheimer's must have been cured.  At least, that is what you would think if you were an obit reader.  I'm one of those.  I learned it from my Dad.  He used to say that every morning he would wake up and look at the newspaper obits.  If his name wasn't there, he'd go to work.
rat
Every other Thursday, we have Trish Vradenburg as our special guest blogger covering Alzh e imer's issues. Trish is a playwright, author, television writer, and Alzheimer's disease advocate. She and her husband, George, founded UsAgainstAlzheimer's with the goal of finding a cure or treatment for Al zheimer's by the year 2020. She brings her legendary humor and wit to the devastating realities of Alzheimer's, and we're excited to have her share with us here.
rat
Oddly enough, I've never wanted to be friends with a rodent. Not cuddly enough.  Not fun to play with. I may have been the only person to dislike the Disney movie "Ratatouille," about Remy, a rat, who dreams of becoming a chef in Paree. With the help of his rat pal, Linguini (spoiler alert!), he makes his dream come true. All I could think about was a RAT preparing my meal.  Yuck!  Would I find little pieces of my brie and crackers mysteriously missing? Would the cheese in my quiche have little teeth marks? Would my apple flambé show signs of whiskers? Would all his helpers be the new members of The Rat Pack?
I have been to some Congressional hearings and might I sum most of them up right now: yawn.
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