Alzheimer's disease

A doctor and patient having a conversation
You've probably never discussed your brain with your doctor, and they've probably never brought it up. But it’s a conversation worth having. Here's why.
A man sitting in a home and thinking
Like your outward appearance, your brain goes through changes as you age. And while some changes are perfectly normal, others are not.
A close up of older hands holding an old photo of a young man
Understanding differences between individuals is crucial for understanding how memory functions or declines in older adults, researchers say.
A woman getting a vaccine shot from a female medical professional
Two new studies find that getting a flu shot and the pneumonia vaccine may also lower people’s risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
A woman and girl picking fruit together outside
To substantially lower your risk of dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease, here’s a to-do list that a new study suggests may help.
If there’s one food that people associate with Valentine’s Day, it’s chocolate. More than half of those celebrating are expected to give candy this year, spending 1.8 billion dollars on sweet treats, according to the National Retail Federation. Although studies that find chocolate is good for your…
brain-health-thumb
In April 2015, the Institute of Medicine released a groundbreaking report on what older Americans can do to keep their brains healthy. The report said that obesity was likely to increase the risk of cognitive decline. The same month, a major study in the British medical journal Lancet found that…
My sister and my grandmother, who I called Dibi.
My grandmother lived with Alzheimer’s disease for years. And for years, my family and I would say things like:
Dad Amy 9-6-15
When I tell people I’m caring for my 91-year-old dad who has Alzheimer’s disease, they look at me sympathetically and say, “I don’t know how you do it.” When they learn that I also cared for my grandmother when she had Alzheimer’s, they gingerly ask, “Are you afraid of getting it yourself?”
Amy Goyer describes her Dad's anxiety, anger and other difficult behaviors due to Alzheimer's and provides tips for coping.
It’s the moodiness that gets to me. And the irritability and all the yelling. Is this really my sweet, kind father?
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