Asian American

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AARP continued its mission to empower all people 50 and over by being a sponsor at all four major diversity and inclusion journalist conferences: the National Association of Black Journalists, the Asian American Journalists Association, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association. AARP hosted booths, workshops, and panel discussions on topics ranging from health and caregiving to the Midterm Elections and what it means to be ‘gay and graying’ in America. AARP’s goal at each conference was to support and cultivate relationships with multicultural media professionals, educate them about AARP’s various programs and services designed for diverse audiences, and offer them story ideas, expert sources, and resources on the issues that matter most to their target audiences.
District-23 Mina Johnson September 17, 2015 in Nashville, Tenn.
Mina Johnson is living the American dream, but it’s one she hadn’t dreamed about growing up. An immigrant from Japan, Johnson is Nashville’s first Asian American and Pacific Islander member of the city council.
#AAPIdisruptaging AAPI disrupt aging
AARP is proud to partner with Next Day Better to share stories of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) disrupting aging. We're excited to show that AAPIs have a voice — and that our combined voices are loud, proud and clear!
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When TV reporter Ryan Yamamoto saw the name Tommy Kono, he wondered, “Who?”
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In the next few months America will elect a new president who will take an oath to preserve, protect and defend our Constitution. Th at person will commit to executing the promises made during the campaign, and voters will begin to hold them accountable. For the past year, AARP has been front and center, holding candidates accountable to Take a Stand on developing real solutions to keep Social Security strong for future generations.
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AARP is proud to announce the winners of its inaugural Asian American and Pacific Islander Community Hero Awards, created to acknowledge the hard-working staff and volunteers of nonprofit organizations serving AAPIs age 50-plus.
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You’d think after a lifetime of growing and harvesting peaches, you’d get sick of eating them. But the Masumoto family still loves peaches and serves them up every way imaginable. “I love peaches, almost literally [they’re] in my blood,” says David “Mas” Masumoto, 62, the farmer who has nurtured his parents’ peach groves.
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Do you know an AAPI hero who works or volunteers at a nonprofit that serves 50-plus Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) — someone who’s always there and can be relied on by the organization? If you do, nominate her or him for AARP’s AAPI Heroes Award.
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