benefits

Retirement
Individuals need better information to know how much to save for retirement. A good place to start is to provide them with a projection of their total retirement income that includes the monthly income they can reasonably expect from their retirement savings and their Social Security benefits. This…
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At Take a Stand, we call the tactic “bird-dogging.” And I believe it’s a major reason Social Security is going to become a much bigger issue in the 2016 presidential campaign.
talking at a Stand for Social Security event
Social Security hasn’t gotten much attention yet in the presidential campaign.
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AARP encourages Americans to review their health insurance options during the Affordable Care Act (ACA) open enrollment period that started Sunday. Open enrollment (from Nov. 1 to Jan. 31) is an important opportunity for consumers to find a plan that could save them more money, offer better…
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John Cherry had no job, no money, no home. What he did have were debilitating health problems and drug and alcohol addictions. “I hit rock bottom,” says the 60-year-old Washington, D.C., resident.
Disabled access sign
No disability? Guess what. You benefit from the Americans With Disabilities Act every single day.
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En español | As Social Security celebrates its 80th birthday, the program remains as popular as ever among all age groups, although some people are skeptical and confused about its long-term financial outlook.
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En español |  Nearly 60 million Social Security recipients will probably not get a cost-of-living increase next year, according to projections in the 2015 Social Security and Medicare trustees reports.
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The financial health of Social Security has improved slightly in the past year, with the system expected to exhaust its reserves to pay benefits in 2034, a year later than previously projected, according to the 2015 Social Security Trustees Report, released July 22. At that time, if Congress has…
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More than one-third of workers say they won’t retire until after age 65, about three times the number saying so in the early 1990s.
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