Blood sugar

A man sitting on a couch with a laptop on his lap
Sitting for hours each day does your brain and body no favors. Here are ways in which too much couch time can be harmful to your brain health as you get older.
A doctor holding up a heart over their chest
A growing body of research shows that habits which benefit your heart also protect brain health. Even habits that you adopt later in life may help.
In February, we are surrounded by hearts. They’re everywhere—in the grocery store, shopping malls and email inboxes. You may also hear more about heart health, because February is  American Heart Month. Taking steps to strengthen your heart yields a bonus—you’ll be protecting your brain as well.
Glasses with cola and ice cubes
For older adults who think drinking diet soda helps their waistline, this will be hard to swallow: New research suggests that the more you drink of those artificially sweetened beverages, the bigger your belly grows.
man testing blood for glucose reading
Older patients are not the same as younger patients. You’d think this was obvious, yet doctors often use a one-size-fits-all approach to prescribing treatment that can put their older patients at risk.
Insulin shot
Having diabetes or prediabetes in midlife is linked to memory problems later in life, according to new research published in Annals of Internal Medicine. In fact,  diabetes appears to age the brain about five years faster than normal aging.
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I apparently have had diabetes for many years but haven't paid much attention to it other than maybe not eating the third slice of pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving and using less than a cup of salt on my french fries. Today, I know better.
90-year-old
News, discoveries and ... fun
Tom Hanks Diabetes Announcement
In a surprise announcement, Tom Hanks, 57, revealed on the Late Show with David Letterman that he has diabetes. While on the show to promote his new film Captain Phillips, he told Letterman that he learned at age 36 that he had high blood sugar. Recently his doctor told him: "You've graduated.…
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There used to be a tradition of taking a little walk after dinner to aid digestion. Turns out, a short walk after eating can do even more: It can help reduce the risk of diabetes in older adults by lowering blood sugar levels for hours after a meal, a new study finds.
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