brain health

A close-up view of avocado slices
If you enjoy munching on peanuts or using olive oil when you cook, you’re not just titillating your taste buds. You’re also consuming monounsaturated fats.
GCBH behavior change report cover
Roadmap charts path to sustained brain health, with recommendations for individuals, communities and policymakers.
A close-up view of four spoons with different coffee beans
If you can’t start your morning without caffeine, you’re not alone. More than 60% of Americans drink coffee every day, the National Coffee Association says.
An up-close view of a woman wearing a puffer jacket with the hood up
It’s a common complaint among older adults: You’re constantly cold. But the reason isn’t just winter — your brain may be partly to blame.
A woman smiling and dancing in front of a blank wall
It’s true that cognitive changes may happen as we get older. So how do you support a healthy brain into your 70s and beyond? Here are some suggestions.
Two hands with a heart rate line connecting them
Research has found that our brains benefit both from the heady throes of falling into a new love and the steady glow of longtime love.
A man smiling as he holds a trumpet
Music’s effects are remarkable, no matter what type of music you enjoy listening to or performing, according to research.
Hands rolling up a yoga mat
If you want to get in shape, consider Pilates. The popular exercise program can improve flexibility and core strength — and it may even offer brain benefits.
Increasing vaccination rates have offered a much-needed break from the fear of serious illness and made many people feel more comfortable gathering in person. As temperatures drop, however, and we turn to more indoor activities, we should remain aware of potential COVID-related risks.
A woman exercising on a stationary bike inside a home
Stationary bikes offer multiple benefits for brain and body, including for older adults with arthritis, back pain and mobility issues.
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