brain health

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Brain health is important to monitor as we age, including when you're in your 50s. Here are a few strategies to strengthen your gray cells.
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Want to help protect your brain? Small lifestyle changes can have a big impact. Here are four steps that women can take to help keep their minds strong.
A doctor and patient having a conversation
You've probably never discussed your brain with your doctor, and they've probably never brought it up. But it’s a conversation worth having. Here's why.
A group of people drinking together on the beach
Staying Sharp’s Faces & Names Challenge is a fun way to both explore memory and learn about strategies that may help you next time you meet someone new.
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Some of the worst things you can do for your brain are bad habits, some of which can really take a toll on its mental abilities.
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Studies show that exposure to the tiniest air pollutant particles is linked to decreased brain volume and the risk of a decline in memory skills.
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One of the best things you can do for your brain is get more sleep, so what can you do to help that? Some experts say to try weighted blankets.
A man pouring a pill from a bottle into his hand
Could the drug you take for insomnia, depression or bladder problems put you at greater risk for mental decline, or even dementia?
A close-up view of an omelette on a plate
Good nutrition is essential to optimal brain function. These simple food switches could benefit your body, mind and mood.
A woman walking three dogs on a rainy day
Research suggests that interacting with animals can benefit body and mind. Here are five reasons petting a pet is good for your brain health.
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