breast cancer

Angela-and-Daniel-Thornton-290x300
Angela Thornton, a quintessential “people person,” has always loved the company of friends and family. She bakes cakes from scratch and cooks old-fashioned soul food recipes, always enjoying entertaining at her home in Washington, D.C.
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The American Cancer Society’s newly announced change in mammogram guidelines has made the debate on when, and how frequently, to get breast cancer screening even more confusing for women.
Robin Roberts
Here’s a chance for you to be part of our conversation with the keynote speaker at AARP’s Life@50+ National Event in Miami. Robin Roberts, the 54-year-old coanchor of ABC’s Good Morning America, is the most trusted person on television, according to recent surveys. She has openly shared both the highs and the lows of her life story with us as she’s steadily moved onto ever-widening public stages.
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Six years ago a federal panel of medical experts said women didn’t need to start getting routine mammograms until they were 50 — not 40, as other medical groups had long advised — and then only every two years.
46th New York Film Festival "Changeling" Premiere - Inside Arrivals
Nearly two years after announcing she had gotten a preventive double mastectomy and encouraging women to get tested for the BRCA1 breast cancer gene, actress and director Angelina Jolie says she has had her ovaries and Fallopian tubes removed to reduce her risk of ovarian cancer, the disease that killed her mother at age 56.
46th New York Film Festival "Changeling" Premiere - Inside Arrivals
Just how big of an effect did movie star Angelina Jolie have on women getting tested for the BRCA breast cancer gene? A hefty 40 percent jump, according to the first study to look at the impact of Jolie’s announcement that she had undergone testing.
Woman receiving radiation therapy
Women 50 or older who have lumpectomies for small breast tumors are being given follow-up radiation treatment that lasts nearly twice as long as guidelines recommend, new research finds.
Prescription
What medical innovations will have the biggest impact in 2015?
A Breast Cancer Story With a Happy Ending
Three years ago at age 55, Ricki Fairley was having a routine physical when her doctor found “a little tiny tumor under my nipple.”
Receipts
The next time the cashier asks, “Would you like your receipt?” the healthiest response might be, “No thanks!” That’s because a small but troubling new study finds that touching a cash register receipt can increase your body’s absorption of a controversial chemical used in the receipt’s coating.
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