careers

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This is a wonderful time of the year to relax, recharge and refocus before the new year begins. It’s also an ideal time for family and friends to gather to catch up, and for you to reflect and begin to focus on your 2017 goals, particularly as they relate to your career. Whether you’re employed and searching for a new job or unemployed and seeking a job, now is the perfect time to develop your execution plan. Here are a few pointers to help you get focused and stay ahead in your job search.
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Are you seeking a career change or a new job? If so, plan to attend  AARP’s Virtual Career Fair, Sept. 20 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. The fair will feature employers from across the country.
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One of the joys of passing age 50 is growing less self-conscious about what people think of me. By now, I know I can usually trust my instincts, and even when I falter, the judgments of others don’t sting like they used to.
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Amid all the shimmer and shine of the new year, many of us find ourselves spending longer than usual on inner reflection — wondering how we might pursue a passion or thinking hard about whether our own skin is still a good fit.
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En español |  Don’t expect boomers to jump into retirement and pursue a life of full-time leisure. Once they leave the workforce, many of them want to, well, continue working — often in an entirely new field.
Leaving the nest
As the economy improves and the job market recovers, experts anticipated that boomerang millennials would move out of their old bedrooms and start living on their own. But that prediction has not become a reality: The country’s 18- to 34-year-olds are less likely to be living independently today than they were in the depths of the Great Recession.
Job or No Job
“What’s your biggest weakness?” is a classic job interview question.
Business people in meeting
AARP has always believed in the value of older workers, that they can be a genuine asset in the workplace. Now we have new evidence to back that up. In the wake of the Great Recession, we took a fresh look at data about hiring and retaining workers who are 50 and older. The AARP study, “ A Business Case for Workers Age 50+,” which came out just last month, not only confirmed earlier research but also indicated that today the case is even stronger for keeping older employees in the workforce.
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Last week, the editor of a newspaper in the Pacific Northwest emailed to check a reference for one of my former students. A position had opened up because the editor had let go a staffer who kept misspelling the names of people in photo captions. In another conversation earlier in the week, the owner of a Maryland consulting company mentioned that she routinely eliminates millennial job candidates when they can’t follow basic directions on a writing test.
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This article originally appeared in “The Power of Ideas: A Collection of Insights to Transform the Future,” The Milken Institute, April 2015.
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