chronic diseases

Pills on top of hundred dollar bill
Retail prices for more than 100 widely used specialty prescription drugs surged by nearly 11 percent in 2013, according to a new AARP Public Policy Institute (PPI) report issued today. The report found that the average annual cost of a specialty medication used to treat chronic diseases and conditions rose to more than $53,000 — greater than the U.S. median income and more than twice the $23,500 median income of people on Medicare.
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Diabetes, Alzheimer's, arthritis and heart disease top the list for the most new drugs in development to treat the common chronic diseases of older Americans, according to a new drug- industry report.
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It's hard to find a more stunning statistic: Nearly 45 percent of hospitalizations among nursing home residents enrolled in Medicare or Medicaid are avoidable. Because of their complex and chronic health care needs, annual spending for their care is more than $300 billion. The total 2011 costs for avoidable hospitalizations for this group are $7 billion to $8 billion.
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Thousands of Medicare recipients with chronic conditions - such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis  and brain injury -  may soon have an easier time getting badly needed home-health care, nursing care and therapy.
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Australians -- they're just like us! And that's not such a good thing ... A new study from Aussie professor Graeme Hugo finds the proportion of Australian boomers with three or more chronic conditions is a whopping 700 percent greater than in the previous generation. And much like their American counterparts, Australian between ages 53 and 62 are more than twice as likely to be obese as their parents were at that age.
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Who would have thought some of our best friends would be the 100 Trillion bacteria living in, and on, our bodies?
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If you exercise in the hopes of reaching your 100th birthday, I've got bad news for you: A large new study of older adults found being physically fit after 50 was not associated with longer overall lifespan. It was, however, linked with less chronic disease -- including heart trouble, diabetes, Alzheimer's, kidney problems, lung cancer and colon cancer -- as participants aged.
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