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En inglés |  AARP envió la siguiente carta al Congreso el 14 de octubre.
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AARP sent the following letter to Congress on Oct. 14.
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En español |  Nearly 60 million Social Security recipients will probably not get a cost-of-living increase next year, according to projections in the 2015 Social Security and Medicare trustees reports.
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Social Security benefits will rise by 1.7 percent starting in January, the Social Security Administration announced Wednesday.
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Social Security benefits will increase by just 1.5 percent next year - about $19 a month for the average retiree.
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Wondering what next year's cost-of-living adjustment for Social Security will be?
The August recess gives Capitol Hill lawmakers a chance to hear from their constituents back home, and sometimes that earful is downright heartbreaking.
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It's not only politicians who have mixed reactions to a different way of calculating cost-of-living adjustments to Social Security benefits. Newspaper editorial writers and columnists are conflicted, too.
BUDGET
The GOP-controlled House of Representatives approved a budget proposal first. Then came a very different document from the Democratic-controlled Senate. Now thousands more pages of numbers will land with a thud on Capitol Hill on April 10.
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The chained CPI - a proposal to change the way the cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) is calculated for Social Security and veterans benefits - can be as confusing as its name. And with it comes a number of daunting statistics:
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