contributions

Many households are considering their financial future this time of year and making planning decisions that will ultimately impact retirement. Follow recent coverage on important resources and mistakes to avoid when planning for retirement.
iStock_000018073630Small
Automatic enrollment for retirement saving is both effective and popular among all income, gender and ethnic groups. It has increased participation, helped people to both start saving earlier and to make appropriate investment choices.This mechanism would be even more useful, especially for younger workers and those with low-to-moderate incomes if retirement savings plans also allowed employees to save for unexpected expenses. Recent research by the US Financial Diaries Project, which looks at the actual income flows of low-to-moderate income consumers shows why this feature would be valuable.
iStock_000011965294Medium
President Barack Obama calls them loopholes, although investors consider them playing by the rules.
Take control of your retirement
Now that we're past the midyear of 2014, it's a great time to review your retirement savings plan to make sure you're on track. If you're not contributing enough or haven't rebalanced your portfolio since George W. Bush was in office, you have the remainder of the year to make some adjustments.
401K "Nest egg" retirement funds
ConocoPhillips Co. has the best 401(k) plan for workers, while Facebook Inc., Amazon.com Inc. and Whole Foods Market Inc. offer some of the worst, according to a Bloomberg News  survey of the 250 largest public companies in the country.
iStock_000026376209Medium
If you're rushing to get your taxes done before today's midnight deadline, take some comfort that you're not alone.
PENSION on calculator display
You've undoubtedly heard the advice again and again: If you are close to retirement age, you should max out your contributions to employer-sponsored retirement plans.
iStock_000008488459Medium
The federal agency that insures private pensions is proposing a rule change that would add greater protection for workers who roll 401(k) money into a traditional pension.
HiRes
It's bad enough that employers are doing away with traditional pensions and adopting 401(k)s that foist all the investing decisions onto workers, leaving them vulnerable to the vagaries of the market.
Like boomers (and all workers, for that matter) don't have enough to worry about when it comes to saving enough for retirement. Now actions by AOL's Tim Armstrong may be setting a dangerous example for other companies to follow.
Search AARP Blogs