intergenerational-classroom
College costs have increased substantially from 1964 to today, and higher costs and borrowing may affect young workers’ retirement security.
Today AARP submitted a letter  to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) commenting on the agency’s proposal to regulate the payday lending industry. For years, many of AARP’s state offices have engaged their state legislatures and governors to secure consumer protections for Americans who find themselves in need of the small-dollar loans that the payday industry offers.
Student loan graphic of graduation cap on hundred dollar bills
College students and others who have student loans are the latest target of IRS impersonators. In this iteration of the ongoing, widespread scam, fraudsters threaten arrest and other penalties unless a nonexistent “federal student tax” is paid immediately.
Retirement
En español | Older workers are less confident today than a decade ago about having enough money for a comfortable retirement, according to a new survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute.
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Celebrating Black History Month is a tremendous opportunity to acknowledge our past achievements, address present challenges and dream about future possibilities. The legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. inspires us to dream about a future that affords us to live in comfort and prosperity. He encourages us to build a legacy of hope and freedom that can be realized in every aspect of our lives. It is in that spirit that we encourage you to evaluate your dream of financial security.
Piggy bank in debt vice grip
We heard through the grapevine about a boomer couple upset because their son, who graduated from a prestigious college and professional school without loans, was marrying a young lawyer with tens of thousands in educational debt. The parents feared that paying off this financial burden would delay the couple in buying a house and starting a family. Wisely, they chose to say nothing.
Saving up for a Rainy Day
We all want our children to be successful and happy. And though being financially fit won’t make anyone happy in and of itself, it can at least take away money stresses and allow the kids to pursue happiness. Just in time for Financial Literacy Month, three journalists from the Wall Street Journal offer 10 great tips in the video below.
Rainy day savings
While waiting in line last week at Starbucks, I realized that I was the only “guest” ordering black coffee — not a grande, no-foam macchiato concoction — and the only person using cash. The mostly millennial customers were flashing a smartphone app or swiping credit or debit cards.
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The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is proposing new rules to restrict high-cost payday and car-title loans that often leave borrowers in worse financial shape.
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Whether your children are 14 or 40, if you are at or near retirement age you must have a conversation about money. The conversation should be age-appropriate, and designed not to frighten, but to inform. Still, 13-year-olds need to know how much college you can afford for them, and 30-year-olds should have a sense of how much money you will have to support yourself when you will retire and what kind of help you may need from them.
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