Our Most-Read Blogs of 2018

From creating a trailblazing initiative that trains bank employees to identify and report suspected financial exploitation, to shining the light on the detrimental health effects and high costs of social isolation, AARP’s Public Policy Institute kept a frenetic pace in 2018, underscoring its identity as a leading “think-and-do” tank. Throughout the year, PPI researched, crunched data and analyzed critical policy issues facing older adults and presented solutions and findings here. Below, we share our most-read blogs for 2018 in four …

AARP’s Healthy Living Initiative: Taking Steps to Prevent Diabetes

Taking steps to live a healthier life is very important to millions of consumers, but many don’t know where to turn or how to engage. There’s an overabundance of information in the health space, yet, paradoxically, some of the most important information is not reaching people to the extent that it should. (A prime example: prediabetes. More on that below.) Through AARP’s Healthy Living Initiative, we’re aiming to empower aging adults to lead their healthiest lives possible by providing the information …

Join Us For Our Live Event: A Conversation About Prediabetes

You’ve probably heard of diabetes—but what about prediabetes? Prediabetes is a condition where blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to qualify as diabetes. While almost half of older adults have prediabetes, nearly nine out of ten don’t know they have it. That’s why having this conversation is so important. On Wednesday, November 7th from 7-8pm ET, join AARP and 100 Black Men of America for a free, interactive telephone town hall about prediabetes among the African American/Black …

New Diabetes Prevention Program Covered under Medicare Part B

Nearly half (48 percent) of U.S. adults ages 65 and older have pre-diabetes, meaning their blood sugar levels are high enough to put them at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is associated with a host of health complications, including stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and even amputations of the legs and feet. What’s more, diabetes is costly. In 2013, diabetes cost the U.S. health system over $100 billion—more than the cost for many other chronic conditions like heart disease, …