disease

Mosquito biting victim
With the start of the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro and peak mosquito season in much of the U.S., expect even more news about the Zika virus — ideal timing for frenzy-feeding fraudsters peddling scams such as:
Birthday cupcake
Did you celebrate a birthday last month? Congratulations. You were born in the month with the lowest lifetime risk of disease.
Illustration of the Ebola virus
Let's see: A nurse who cared for a dying Ebola patient is allowed to fly on a commercial flight days later despite having a low-grade fever. Another worker who handled the patient's lab specimens takes a cruise and has to be quarantined aboard the ship. Officials with the hospital where the man died admit nurses were never given Ebola training. Is this how the U.S. thinks it will protect citizens against this disease?
Illustration of the Ebola virus
The country’s first Ebola patient—Thomas Eric Duncan, who was visiting Dallas from West Africa—has died. But the fact that he was  mistakenly sent home when he first showed up at a Texas hospital complaining of symptoms, does not exactly inspire confidence in our healthcare system.
Fist bumping
Manners maven Emily Post probably would have disapproved, but British researchers say if you want to protect yourself against germs, you should pass on the traditional handshake and instead exchange a fist bump, especially with your doctor.
Doctor with elderly patient
Should older adults be routinely screened for Alzheimer's disease or memory problems? Maybe, maybe not. A government panel says there's not yet enough data to recommend either for or against it. The panel's uncertainty reflects the complexity of the issue at a time when scientists are progressing much faster in their ability to diagnose Alzheimer's than in their ability to treat it.
Alzheimer's affecting women disproportionately for getting disease and caring for those with dementia
If you are a woman, a new report from the Alzheimer's Association might just jolt you upright. Consider:
2 Boomer Babes AARP Radio show series "Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's" highlights victims and caregiver perspectives.
Alzheimer's. Just hearing the word makes my heart lurch and my body tense up. It's a disease that has hit very close to home for me. Both my grandmother and now my sweet Daddy are victims of Alzheimer's disease. Yet I'm a believer that the more we talk about it, the closer we get to effective treatments and a cure. The more stories we share with one another, the more hopeful we become - and the less alone we feel. A recent AARP radio series  helps to do just that. "Beyond the Face of Alzheimer's," from Barbara Kline and Kathy Bernard, cohosts of the  2 Boomer Babes Radio Hour,  gives voice to those with Alzheimer's as well as their caregivers. The series won a Gracie Award for best lifestyle/health coverage.
Vivian Davis-art
Whenever Vivian Davis feels like doing something, she does it. So when she felt like joining the Peace Corps, she did - at age 78.
Pay it forward
Maybe it's part of the push for "random acts of kindness" or a reaction against all the vitriol and general mean-spiritedness in our society or - as a recent study found - because doing something unselfish helps lower inflammation and improves our health.
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