employees

Laptop shows user interface of online job search
Are you seeking a career change or a new job? If so, plan to attend  AARP’s Virtual Career Fair, Sept. 20 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. The fair will feature employers from across the country.
Business people in meeting
AARP has always believed in the value of older workers, that they can be a genuine asset in the workplace. Now we have new evidence to back that up. In the wake of the Great Recession, we took a fresh look at data about hiring and retaining workers who are 50 and older. The AARP study, “ A Business Case for Workers Age 50+,” which came out just last month, not only confirmed earlier research but also indicated that today the case is even stronger for keeping older employees in the workforce.
Older workers
Workers 50 and older face a hurdle that younger peers don’t: how to overcome negative stereotypes that paint them as much more expensive, out of touch with technology and less productive.
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More than one-third of workers say they won’t retire until after age 65, about three times the number saying so in the early 1990s.
Yield sign that reads "retirement ahead"
Illinois will become the first state with a broad-based effort to automatically enroll private-sector employees without retirement plans into a new savings program.
Candy Corn
News, discoveries and ... fun
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Financial planners have been advising us to wait as long as possible to collect Social Security to maximize the benefit. A new study finds that many middle-income workers haven't heeded that call. They were more likely than higher earners to claim their benefit early and live on a permanently reduced payout for the rest of their lives.
Lawsuit form on a desk
Most employers realize that age is not a legal - or valid - reason to terminate an employee. That doesn't stop some companies from trying to circumvent the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) by asking terminated employees to sign waivers that promise never to sue for age discrimination.
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A friend who supervises interns recently complained about a young man she gave an assignment to one morning. When she passed his desk a few hours later, he was surfing the Web. His explanation: assignment complete so he was taking a break. Argh!
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Some 52 million Americans rely on their 401(k) savings plans as a key part of their retirement. Now, the Washington-based Center for American Progress says in a new study that high investment fees could cost the typical worker $100,000 or more over the course of a four-decade career. That may force some to stay on the job at least  three years longer than they'd planned just to make up for that loss.
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