employment

Older Black male professional working on strategic issue
Unemployment data reveal the ongoing discrepancies in unemployment rates among older workers by race, ethnicity, and sex, many of which further intensified during various points in the pandemic.
The event is part of our broader effort to raise awareness of how the working world is changing.
Female works in a factory warehouse.
Many of the workers who retired during the pandemic were already at or beyond retirement age, making them less likely to return to work. But workers in the 65+ age group can be drawn back into the workforce under certain conditions.
Older adults face disproportionate barriers to getting back into the workforce, and many are unable to find a job that matches their previous salary.
Woman working at computer
Until the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, older women were among the fastest-growing demographic groups in the US workforce.
Man using laptop
Will some retirees return to the labor force?
In many ways, we are still in the eye of the storm when it comes to seeing the employment effects of COVID-19.
Older worker
Men ages 55 and older had among the largest declines in labor force participation rates during the pandemic.
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted labor market inequities. A growing body of research shows how much the economy stands to gain from addressing them.
Many of the trends that informed predictions about the future US workforce have reversed during the pandemic. Now economists wonder how workers across multiple generations will bear the pandemic's effects into the next decade.
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