exercise

A woman holding a yoga mat on her shoulder
As you contemplate ways to embrace a new you — a healthier and calmer version of yourself — consider how yoga can support this positive momentum.
A man using an exercise bike in a cycle class
Looking for an effective and healthy way to improve your mood and get more energy? Doing regular workouts may be the answer.
A bicycle parked on a sidewalk against a wall
Cycling has soared in popularity during the pandemic, and research has found it can be good for both your brain and your body.
Hands rolling up a yoga mat
If you want to get in shape, consider Pilates. The popular exercise program can improve flexibility and core strength — and it may even offer brain benefits.
Denise Austin demonstrating a plank
There are plenty of moves that help keep your body (and brain) in top form. Here are ways to gain strength, without gym equipment.
A group of women smiling together after finishing a breast cancer awareness race
The U.S. now has about 17 million cancer survivors. So what can they do to stay healthy, both mentally and physically, as they age?
Three women looking out at something
Five years ago, three friends who loved the outdoors quit their jobs, traded their homes for RVs and began hiking their way across the country.
An active man with earphones outdoors in nature
Need to jog your memory? Do a little exercise. Even a single, short session is all it may take to give your brain a memory boost.
A man and woman smiling and walking together on the beach
A leisurely stroll isn’t just good for your body. It’s good for your brain, too, acording to a study that followed 65 adults of various ages.
An ethnic senior woman smiles while kayaking with her husband
Information and advice on living more healthy lives, it seems, is everywhere. It’s on every platform, digital and traditional—online and print, videos and books, webinars and live seminars, network news and online features.
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