exercise

300-vigorous-exercises-reduces-heart-attacks
North Las Vegas residents have a new place to work out, make friends and spend time outdoors at AARP's newest FitLot fitness park.
Nick Krembs smiling as he gardens on one knee with others
In the 1970s, Nick Krembs headed east to live where there are woods and mountains. Now in his 70s, he's still enjoying the outdoors — through trail work.
An above view of workout equipment, water bottle and towel on a white background
Trying to improve your memory? Hitting the gym for some strength training workouts can help — and it may not take as much time as you think.
People exercising on stationary bikes next to each other
Want to help improve your memory? Engaging in regular workouts that get your heart pumping faster can help, research shows.
A woman holding a yoga mat on her shoulder
As you contemplate ways to embrace a new you — a healthier and calmer version of yourself — consider how yoga can support this positive momentum.
A man using an exercise bike in a cycle class
Looking for an effective and healthy way to improve your mood and get more energy? Doing regular workouts may be the answer.
A bicycle parked on a sidewalk against a wall
Cycling has soared in popularity during the pandemic, and research has found it can be good for both your brain and your body.
Hands rolling up a yoga mat
If you want to get in shape, consider Pilates. The popular exercise program can improve flexibility and core strength — and it may even offer brain benefits.
Denise Austin demonstrating a plank
There are plenty of moves that help keep your body (and brain) in top form. Here are ways to gain strength, without gym equipment.
A group of women smiling together after finishing a breast cancer awareness race
The U.S. now has about 17 million cancer survivors. So what can they do to stay healthy, both mentally and physically, as they age?
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