expenses

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How are families paying for college?
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Most people define their net worth in dollars. As a financial planner, I define net worth in time. Allow me to explain.
Doctor with patient
You’ve heard this before, I know, and yet it remains as disturbing as ever. Health care costs, along with housing, are likely to be your biggest expenses in retirement. Boston-based  Fidelity Investments found that premiums, deductibles and other out-of-pocket expenses could cost a 65-year-old couple retiring today a jaw-dropping $220,000 – and that’s in addition to Medicare premiums.
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You need some expensive medical care yet don't have the insurance or money to pay for it. Should you use a medical credit card that's pitched at some doctors' offices?
medical invoice
Are you and your spouse thinking about retiring early? Doing so can cost you, as a couple, an extra $17,000 a year in medical costs, according to a Fidelity Investments analysis.
Cell phone and dollars
Cheering their new grads at college commencements this month, parents will likely give another hurrah: No more tuition! But there's another cost that might well linger on for parents of high school and college grads: the cellphone bill.
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Whether you're nearing the end of your working life or still several decades away, Americans all share the same financial fear: Will I have enough money to retire?
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The road to retirement may seem uncomfortably short, particularly if you're in your 50s and haven't saved much.
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Holiday travel these days is a Santa-sized hassle and it can be a real budget buster as well.
Holiday gifts
This could very well be the year when the Grinch steals Christmas, at least in terms of the gift-giving intentions of some adults. According to a new poll from the personal finance website GoBankingRates.com, 40 percent of some 1,500 survey respondents say they won't be buying any holiday gifts this year. Blame the economy and the shaky finances of many Americans.
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