"health care"

A gavel and a stethoscope
Are State Innovation Waivers harmful or helpful? It depends how states use them.
Older patient talking with nurse in hospital
It has been awhile since I’ve been asked why AARP has a center devoted to nursing. Maybe that is because it’s been a part of AARP long enough that by now people know. After all, it has been 12 years since the Center to Champion Nursing in America began its mission to see that people—all people—have access to a nurse when and where they need it.
“Any changes to Medicare should help, not hurt, patients,” say the PhRMA ads. Yet PhRMA’s actions tell a different story.
“Without SNAP, I don’t know how I’d be able to afford to eat.”
Implantable devices, such as hip replacements and heart valves, are a central part of medical treatment today. Americans receive about 370,000 cardiac pacemakers and about 1 million total hip and knee replacements per year. Despite how common the use of implantable devices is, little information is publicly available on the prices paid for these devices in the United States. Limited information about prices and performance of many implantable devices has raised concerns that providers, consumers and insurers may be paying too much for these devices.
African American woman helping Senior man use walker
AARP has named HomeExcept Inc. the grand prize winner of the AARP Innovation Champion Awards competition. The team was awarded $10,000 in cash for designing a home care sensor that allows caregivers to monitor loved ones by using thermal sensors to track movement.
Medicaid is the country’s largest public health insurance program, providing access to needed health care and long-term services and supports  (LTSS) to millions of low-income Americans, including more than 17 million children with disabilities, adults with disabilities, and poor seniors.
Screening for osteoporosis among high-risk populations, including postmenopausal women, is essential. Women found to have low bone density due to osteoporosis or osteopenia (a precursor to osteoporosis) can reduce their risk of future bone fracture with lifestyle changes and drug therapies. The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that all women ages 65 years and older undergo bone density testing to screen for osteoporosis, and that some younger women receive targeted screening based on individual risk assessments.
The recently enacted 21st Century Cures Act will mean welcome changes to electronic health records (EHRs) as we know them. In short, the EHR piece of the Cures Act is good news for consumers. Here’s why.
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