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States are increasingly turning to reinsurance programs to improve their individual health insurance markets
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Are State Innovation Waivers harmful or helpful? It depends how states use them
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New Hampshire court found that work and community engagement requirements do not support the basic objective of the Medicaid program
Medicaid benefits many low-income Medicare beneficiaries, children, and people with disabilities, but new policies could cause beneficiaries to lose their coverage if they can't comply with the requirements
Federal subsidies, known as cost-sharing reductions (CSRs), have been critical to ensuring that over 2 million lower-income adults ages 50 to 64 who purchase coverage through health insurance Marketplaces can afford health care. [1] Despite the subsidies’ crucial role, the Administration announced yesterday that it will terminate payments for CSRs. The announcement—which comes less than 3 weeks before millions of Americans who buy insurance on the individual market start shopping for 2018 health coverage— is bad news for older adults and people of all ages.
A late-breaking attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) threatens to weaken critical federal consumer protections and raise costs for older Americans ages 50-64 who purchase health insurance coverage in the individual market. Tucked into the sweeping legislation known as the Graham-Cassidy bill are provisions allowing states to receive waivers from crucial consumer protections. Such waivers could allow insurance companies to increase costs for older consumers based on their health, preexisting conditions, and age–potentially putting health coverage out of financial reach for millions.
Did you know that over 3 million older adults ages 50-64 rely on Affordable Care Act (ACA) tax credits to purchase health coverage? In fact, pre-ACA, almost half of them were uninsured.
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By Jordan Rau, Kaiser Health News
Here are five major improvements the Affordable Care Act has made for people who are uninsured or undersinsured
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By Jay Hancock and Julie Appleby, Kaiser Health News
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