health law

US Supreme Court
Some 6.4 million Americans in states relying on the healthcare.gov federal insurance exchange will continue to receive subsidies for coverage after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled June 25 that the Affordable Care Act allows such financial support.
US Supreme Court
AARP applauds the U.S. Supreme Court’s King v. Burwell decision today that allows individuals who purchased health insurance through the federal exchange to continue receiving subsidies to help pay premiums. The Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) goals of improving affordability and removing barriers to access for health insurance have been critical in reducing the number of uninsured Americans. Importantly, for older Americans, we have seen a 31 percent drop in the uninsured rate for those ages 50-64.
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The health law’s expansion of Medicaid coverage to adults with incomes over the poverty line was key to reducing the uninsured rate among 50- to 64-year-olds from nearly 12 percent to 8 percent in 2014, according to a new analysis.
US Supreme Court
For the second time in three years, the federal Affordable Care Act went before the Supreme Court on Wednesday. And before a packed courtroom, a divided group of justices mostly picked up right where they left off the last time.
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The Obama administration said Friday it will allow a special health law enrollment period from March 15 to April 30 for consumers who realize while filling out their taxes that they owe a fee for not signing up for coverage last year.
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By Jay Hancock, Kaiser Health News
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By Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health News Staff Writer
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When the virtual doors to the new Health Insurance Marketplace open next month, Americans in the 50-through-64 "pre-Medicare" age bracket may be the ones rushing in first.
Doughnut Hole Closing
The Affordable Care Act is three years old. So what does that mean? What has happened to improve health care over the past few years? Let's take a quick look:
By Phil Galewitz, Senior Correspondent, Kaiser Health News
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