hearing aids

Lower hearing aid costs will be good news for consumers, especially seniors with hearing loss.
Amy Goyer describes her Dad's struggle with Alzheimer's and hearing loss and the solution she found for him.
When Dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, I knew he would need all of his senses to help interpret the world around him and balance his changing cognitive abilities. But he has hearing impairment and limited vision (glaucoma plus visual-processing problems associated with Alzheimer’s). Even though there is only so much I can do about the visual issues, I assumed  hearing aids would solve his auditory problems. I was wrong. The good news is that we eventually discovered a surprisingly simple solution.
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I love the five weeks that begin with Thanksgiving and end with New Year’s, but a part of me also thinks, “Bah, humbug.”
Hearing Aid
For several years, studies have linked hearing loss and dementia, but no major study has addressed the big question: Could using hearing aids reduce the risk of cognitive decline?
Hearing Aid
A new federal advisory report wants to make buying a hearing aid as easy and inexpensive as buying prescription eyeglasses, calling for changes to “dramatically increase competition and increase new choices for millions of Americans” experiencing hearing loss.
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The ads call them “invisible hearing aids,” describing them as “discreet,” “well-hidden” and “virtually undetectable.”
equality
Thinking and reading about the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, 25 years ago this week, has been a surprising reminder of how far we have come in a relatively short span. Twenty-five years — July 26, 1990.
Young female patient discuss with doctors on her medical exam at hospital
Do you think you’re losing your hearing? You probably are. Two-thirds of those over 75 have some degree of hearing loss, and so do a substantial percentage of younger people.
Couple driving in red convertible
Remember those lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer with the top down—or at least the windows open — and Top 40 blasting from the radio.
Affordable Care Act on a tablet screen
Last week’s Supreme Court affirmation of the Affordable Care Act is good news for the 6.4 million Americans who stood to lose their health insurance if the decision had gone the other way. But it doesn’t improve matters for those with hearing loss.
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