home and community based services

There is both an opportunity and an imperative to redesign the next Scorecard. This tool has the potential to draw further attention to critical issues in LTSS exposed by the COVID-19 crisis and help states build and maintain momentum in their efforts to modernize their LTSS systems.
The pandemic has changed the way we think of long-term care, and if we lean into the crisis-earned set of lessons learned, we can do more than just tweak the system. We can transform it.
While states are offering consumers more choices for long-term services and supports (LTSS), we still have far to go to balance institutional care and home and community-based services (HCBS). Now there is a major opportunity to pick up the pace of that change.
mother and daughter
Presumptive eligibility expands consumer choice and can empower consumers to access public funded home and community-based services without lengthy determination delays.
Self-direction allows individuals to have greater choice over the services and supports they receive, including hiring and managing their own paid caregivers and purchasing items to live more independently at home.
No one should have to go bankrupt when their spouses need Medicaid for home- and community-based services, such as help with eating, bathing or dressing. But unless Congress acts, people could lose this important protection
Senior couple in wheelchair in autumn nature.
The future is unclear for a major federal demonstration program that was created to expand the range of long-term services and supports (LTSS) options available to individuals
older americans act chart
The Act provides home- and community-based services to help keep older adults living at home, where most prefer to live
WFGblog2
In our seminal 2017 Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) State Scorecard, we issued a call to action to “pick up the pace of change.” To help accelerate LTSS reforms, we have released a series of Promising Practices and Emerging Innovations reports that provide real-world solutions.
Demographic Graphic
A major demographic shift is happening. The ages 85+ population is projected to triple between 2015 and 2050. In comparison, the population younger than age 65 will increase by only 12 percent.
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