hurricane

Hosted in Dallas, the 2017 AARP Livable Communities National Conference was an opportunity for elected officials, planning professionals, local leaders and community advocates from throughout the nation to share ideas, best practices and solutions for making towns, cities and communities more livable for people of all ages.
There was enough warning, you could watch the weather channel and the local news to watch the path of Hurricane Sandy. Everyone knew she was coming. Experts were predicting the worst-case scenarios. But in the aftermath, the truth of what Hurricane Sandy left behind in the burned-out homes in Breezy Point, Queens, to the flooded buildings and subways in New York City. The reality of the devastation was widespread and heartbreaking. In the words of President Obama  "This is going to take some time," he said. "It is not going to be easy for these communities to recover." We have seen the resiliency of New York City and it's citizens' uncanny ability to pull together in times of great tragedy. From the terrorist attacks of 9/11, to Hurricane Sandy, New Yorkers have a spirit that is not so easily broken.
Here in Washington, D.C. most people have stocked their cabinets with water, batteries and non-perishable foods and settled into their cozy homes to weather the severe rain and wind that Hurricane Sandy is unleashing. But what about those who don't have a roof over their head?
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If you're planning on using a portable generator for power should Hurricane Sandy wipe out electricity in your region, beware: Nearly 100 people die every year from carbon monoxide poisoning caused by using their generators incorrectly.
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Guest Post: As AARP's Sustainability Manager, Pam Evans has led the effort to incorporate environmentally responsible practices into AARP's internal business operations. She's passionate about educating members on the importance of responsible use of resources, and the direct connection between the declining health of the environment and the health of our, and future, generations. 
The Boy Scouts had it right. Their motto is "be prepared" and if the St. Louis tornado Friday taught us anything, it's to try and always heed this warning. The tornado was the strongest the area had seen in 44 years. Its 200 mph winds leveled houses and destroyed the roof of the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport.
The 2010 Hurricane Season officially started yesterday and according to Colorado State University's Tropical Meteorology Project, the activity this season will be above-average.
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AARP staff joins volunteers from around the country to continue rebuilding efforts in St. Bernard's Parish, Louisiana
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