independent living

Pedal_car
In this season of thanks and giving, Bill Deimling of Cincinnati considers himself one of the lucky ones. That's because he gets to give more than he receives.
canes as assistive devices, disability study
According to a new  disability study, two-thirds of people 65 and older need help to perform what are known as the activities of daily living (showering or bathing, eating, dressing, getting out of bed or a chair, walking and using the toilet). Help can take the form of using scooters, grab bars, canes or other people to stay well-functioning.
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Have you taken a good look around your home to see if it will accommodate the changes your body will likely go through as it ages? Have you done a similar scan at the home of an older relative or friend where you might be helping out? It's not a bad idea. We make sure our homes are protected and we're vigilant about making them safe for children. Why not make them more comfortable and convenient to accommodate the normal age-related physical changes that creep up on us? Why not make the home more functional and safe to accommodate limitations we may experience due to disease or chronic health conditions?
Delias EG Bike by Richard Masoner
The bicycle: It's one of the best inventions of all time, the essential precursor to the automobile that led to modern brakes, gearing and much more. And now it's reinventing itself, in ways that can help you save money and stay healthy.
CPR Training
According to its website, Glenwood Gardens in Bakersfield, Calif., says "our caring staff are trained and equipped to give aid or assistance whenever needed or requested." They claim it offers "the best in independent living, assisted living, memory or nursing care. Glenwood Gardens is the place to be."
Tips and tools from Amy Goyer for aging at home with the help of technology.
Some call it the "bonus years," others call it a challenge.  Either way, we're living longer lives (in 1900, the average life expectancy was about 47...now it's about 78) and more than ever we want to remain active, healthy and most importantly independent . And for most, that means one thing: AARP research indicates 9 out of 10 people want to stay in their own homes as they age. With retirement lasting as much as 20, 30 or even 40 years for some, how will we pull off this lofty goal?
michelle
Editor's note: This is seventh in a series of posts by guest blogger Michelle Seitzer.
senior diners
Nothing like a disabled person to ruin your appetite.
michelle
Editor's note: This is fourth in a series of posts by guest blogger Michelle Seitzer.
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