Indiana

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Meet Jeff and Capi Saxton. Jeff is a bookbinder and Capi manages a small fabric and sewing supply store. Now in their 50s, they’ve found it hard to save for retirement. “There will be no retirement for me,” Jeff says. “I’ll always have to work.”
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Nancy was caring for her mother and husband, raising four children, and working full time when she ended up in the hospital, suffering from exhaustion. It was then that she realized that she couldn’t help her loved ones unless she also took care of herself.
Elaine and Pop
This weekend we all had the opportunity to celebrate our fathers. As I remembered my Pop — a funny, hardworking, unselfish man — I thought about his devotion to my mom, especially during their later lives when he was her primary caregiver. He shouldered huge responsibilities that I think weighed heavily on his mind.
Work-and-Save-Blog
Think about retiring from your job with no savings — not even a little bit — just debt. Unfortunately this is the case for one in five Utahans, according to a new study released recently by Notalys LLC. This news is troubling, to say the least. To make matters worse, with 45 percent of working-age households having nothing — zero dollars — saved toward retirement, what’s playing out in Utah could have significance nationwide.
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Valentine’s Day may be over, but 42 million Americans continue to give their hearts each and every day. They are family caregivers who help parents, spouses, aunts, uncles and other loved ones to live independently at home, where they want to be. For these unsung heroes, love goes beyond chocolate and roses — and their labor of love means driving to doctor’s appointments, cooking, cleaning, helping bathe and dress their loved ones, managing medications, performing medical tasks and more.
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For five years Michele from Montana, didn’t have access to affordable health care. She didn’t go to the doctor because she couldn’t afford it; this scared her. When health care laws began to change, Michele began to dream about what it would be like to have health coverage again, and how she would take better care of herself. But when many others gained access to affordable care last year, Michele did not. Instead, she was one of millions of hard-working Americans who fell into the new coverage gap.
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Alice from Texas cared for her husband, Cort, after he suffered a severe stroke.  She recently shared her story on I Heart Caregivers, writing, “After a week in intensive care, three weeks in a rehab facility and a month in a nursing home, I brought my husband home to begin his care. He came home with a severe wound on his back. I learned wound care, changing catheters, all the duties of a home healthcare nurse. Since then, he has had numerous hospital admissions, emergency room visits…”
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When their grandfather’s health declined, Christina and her brother, Michael, stepped in to care for their “Papa.” Together they did everything he needed to stay at home, where he wanted to be. Christina shared:
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When you’re sick, what do you do?
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Today's sobering statistic: Almost 20 percent of people ages 55 to 64 have no retirement savings. And even among those who have saved, millions are facing a retirement "deficit" - meaning they will outlive their retirement savings by $57,000 on average per household.
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