jean accius

As the month of June winded down, a federal court issued a ruling invalidating Kentucky’s effort to attach work and other community engagement requirements to receive Medicaid benefits.
The United States is quickly approaching a historic milestone. By 2035, the number of older adults age 65 and older will exceed the number of children for the first time in American history. Each day, 10,000 people turn 65, and that will continue for years to come. This will impact states and communities and reshape industries.
A son helps his father in Frederick, Maryland.
Most people think of family caregivers as women taking care of their aging parents or children. What many don’t know is that 40 percent of the 40 million family caregivers in this country are men. These men range in age from 20-something to 60-something and up. Some step into the role suddenly after a family member or friend is injured or falls ill; for others, the role increases gradually as parents age or someone close is diagnosed with a fatal illness.
As more than 3,000 leaders and professionals in the field of aging gather in San Francisco for the 2018 Aging in America conference, addressing the needs of the aging population and the number of people living with disabilities will be top of mind. That’s more important than ever.
The New Year offers us the opportunity to start anew. We make plans to hit the gym, sleep more, and eat healthier. We commit to spending more time with family and friends rather than merely clicking likes and posting comments on Facebook or sending emojis via text. We resolve to save more and stress less.  Many of us even create plans with specific strategies to increase the odds we’ll be successful in reaching our goals.
I recently had the opportunity to participate on a panel sponsored by Genworth that turned out to be a truly candid and oftentimes personal discussion on an emerging crisis. The topic: “ Solving America’s Long-Term Care Crisis: What We Can Do Now to Fix the $750 Billion Program.”
The latest Senate health reform bill, known as Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson, puts Medicaid back on the chopping block. The proposal would change the way the federal government currently funds Medicaid by limiting federal funding and shifting cost over time to both states and Medicaid enrollees, and their families.  New AARP Public Policy Institute projections find that the per enrollee cap proposal in Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson will cut between $1.2 trillion and $3.2 trillion from total (federal and state) Medicaid spending over the 20-year period between 2017 and 2036 (see table 1 below).
KS
The Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) now under consideration in the Senate would drastically alter Kansas’s Medicaid program. The proposed Senate bill would change the way the federal government currently funds Medicaid by limiting federal funding and shifting cost over time to both states and Medicaid enrollees. The BCRA would subject older adults, adults with disabilities, Medicaid expansion adults, and non-disabled children under age 19 to mandatory per enrollee caps beginning in 2020. State Medicaid programs would have the option to choose between block grants and per enrollee caps for non-elderly, non-disabled, non-expansion adults.
NV
  The Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) now under consideration in the Senate would drastically alter Nevada’s Medicaid program. The proposed Senate bill would change the way the federal government currently funds Medicaid by limiting federal funding and shifting cost over time to both states and Medicaid enrollees. The BCRA would subject older adults, adults with disabilities, Medicaid expansion adults, and non-disabled children under age 19 to mandatory per enrollee caps beginning in 2020. State Medicaid programs would have the option to choose between block grants and per enrollee caps for non-elderly, non-disabled, non-expansion adults.
ME map
The Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) now under consideration in the Senate would drastically alter Maine’s Medicaid program. The proposed Senate bill would change the way the federal government currently funds Medicaid by limiting federal funding and shifting cost over time to both states and Medicaid enrollees. The BCRA would subject older adults, adults with disabilities, Medicaid expansion adults, and non-disabled children under age 19 to mandatory per enrollee caps beginning in 2020. State Medicaid programs would have the option to choose between block grants and per enrollee caps for non-elderly, non-disabled, non-expansion adults.
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