journalism

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Former Washington Post executive editor Benjamin C. Bradlee was one of the biggest names in journalism. He was so big that when the world thought of him, it pictured Jason Robards, the actor who portrayed Bradlee in the hit 1976 movie All the President's Men.
Bribing
The abrupt firing this week of Jill Abramson, the first female executive editor of the  New York Times, once again puts a spotlight on unequal pay between men and women doing similar jobs, as details continue to leak.
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And so The Year of Barbara has a firm end-date: May 16.
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PolitiFact, the website that measures statements by politicians and talking heads against the public record, must be doing something right.
Autumn leaves
The leaves of the maple trees have turned an iridescent gold along the Oregon coast and in the inland woods, suggesting that each leaf shines from an inner glow generated by the sun. Among them in perfect harmony are the deep reds of the amber leaves, adding to the chromatic mix that creates the beauty of nature's clock, ticking off the days to winter.
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Before he was the voice of his generation and "the most trusted man in America," Walter Cronkite was a 20-something war correspondent writing letters home to his new wife.
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There are two schools of thought about USA Today founder Al Neuharth, who died on April 19 at age 89 in Cocoa Beach, Fla. Some think he helped ruin the newspaper, an institution older than our country itself, by turning it into a paper-and-ink imitation of TV news. Others think he helped modernized a desperately outdated medium and, in so doing, perhaps staved off its demise.
This week the Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) scolded the media for their coverage of Social Security in a piece called How the Media Has Shaped the Social Security Debate.  Trudy Lieberman writes "For nearly three years CJR has observed that much of the press has reported only one side of this story using 'facts' that are misleading or flat-out wrong while ignoring others."
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