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Last year, the organization that founded Black History Month, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History ( ASALH), celebrated its centennial year. From 1915 to the present, this group has documented the contributions that black people have made to the incredible history and legacy of the United States.
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En español | What are you doing to keep your brain healthy? When it comes to our brain health,” we Latinos are not always so diligent. We can easily discuss diabetes, how to lower our cholesterol or how to relieve the pain of arthritis inherited from our grandmother. We diet to lose weight for our daughter’s upcoming wedding, we walk to find a cure for our friend’s cancer; but even though we know it’s important to keep our minds healthy, we don't always take steps to slow or prevent the cognitive diseases that can develop over time.
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Poet and civil rights leader Maya Angelou once said, “Perhaps travel cannot prevent bigotry, but by demonstrating that all peoples cry, laugh, eat, worry, and die, it can introduce the idea that if we try and understand each other, we may even become friends.”
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I had the honor of speaking at the AARP North Carolina State Office Multicultural Outreach Awards Dinner on May 21 at the historic International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro, N.C. The event celebrated the contributions of six organizations that are giving “the most” to improve the quality of life for North Carolinians.
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His voice was deep; his soul was too. His humor made you rock with laughter; his insight rocked your world. I never got to squeeze Al Martinez’s hand or give him a hug, though I often wanted to. We lived six hours apart, but when we talked by phone, Al, who died Jan. 12, was in my living room, sitting next to my desk.
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At AARP, we look at life after 50 as an exciting opportunity to enjoy a second youth. Retirement itself should then be seen as a hopeful journey rather than stepping into the unknown.
AARP sponsored a dynamite general session at the annual conference of the American Society on Aging.   The session, "The Changing Face of America: Aging in our Multicultural Society," featured Lorraine Cortes-Vazquez, AARP's EVP of Multicultural Markets and Engagement, Jennie Chin Hansen, Pres. and CEO of American Geriatrics Society and Immediate Past Pres. of AARP, Fernando Torres-Gil, Assoc. Dean of CA Los Angeles School of Public Affairs and AARP Board member, and Maya Rockeymoore, Pres. and CEO of Global Policy Solutions.
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