lawsuit

US Supreme Court
Some 6.4 million Americans in states relying on the healthcare.gov federal insurance exchange will continue to receive subsidies for coverage after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled June 25 that the Affordable Care Act allows such financial support.
US Supreme Court
AARP applauds the U.S. Supreme Court’s King v. Burwell decision today that allows individuals who purchased health insurance through the federal exchange to continue receiving subsidies to help pay premiums. The Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) goals of improving affordability and removing barriers to access for health insurance have been critical in reducing the number of uninsured Americans. Importantly, for older Americans, we have seen a 31 percent drop in the uninsured rate for those ages 50-64.
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A new poll finds that most people think Congress or states should act to restore health insurance subsidies if the Supreme Court decides later this year they are not permitted in states where the federal government is running the marketplace.
Faygo bottling plant and corporate offices in Detroit
Detroit-based Faygo, a fixture in the soft drink industry since 1907, is being sued for age discrimination by the grandson of one of the company's founders.
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Every now and then, a jury reaches deep into a defendant's pockets to punish it for its reprehensible conduct and to deter others from engaging in similar acts.
Financial Problems.
Here's some good news for people hounded by relentless debt collectors and hauled into court. Two of the nation's biggest debt collection companies have agreed t o stop lawsuits against borrowers and drop collections on some $16 million in judgments.
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On April 22, the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a lawsuit that some think will determine the future of television - or, at the very least, whether you can watch local TV news and broadcast channels over the Internet, without having to buy a cable TV subscription.
Wal-Mart store front
In 2011, Wal-Mart was the talk of the nation when a gender discrimination case against the huge discount store chain went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The plaintiffs in the case lost for procedural reasons, not for anything having to do with their discrimination claims. The accusations of gender discrimination have never been disproved, and several of the plaintiffs in the original case have filed new lawsuits.
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In 2012, Robert Allen Stanford was convicted of running a Ponzi scheme that bilked investors to the tune of $7 billion. While that might be only a fraction of the $65 billion that Bernard Madoff got away with, it's still about 10 percent of New York City's budget for 2013.
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At the time AARP took up their cause, Robert Bennett of Annapolis, Md., and Leila Joseph of Brooklyn, N.Y., had several things in common. They were older Americans. They were widowed. They were homeowners. And they both faced foreclosure and eviction on reverse mortgage loans.
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