mental health

Innovation in health care is happening all around us. Read our four main takeaways from HLTH 2019.
Amy Goyer shares how to keep your sanity while caring for others.
“How do you stay sane?”
Audrey Carroll Native Plant Sale
The longevity capital of the world, as you may recently have read in the AARP Bulletin, is the Nagano region of Japan, where women can expect to live an average of 87.2 years and men an average of 80.9 years. Experts chalk it up to a healthy diet, regular physical activity, extended work years and aggressive government intervention.
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A simple blood test that a researcher calls a "game changer" may be able to accurately predict whether older adults will develop dementia.
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[ View the story "Susan Boyle: 'I Have Asperger's'" on Storify]
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Who do you think is lonelier - adults in their mid to late 40s or adults age 70 and older? One might surmise that the older folks have experienced more loss of loved ones, diminished physical or mental abilities and/or are less active, which could lead to increased loneliness. Counter to what many people think, folks ages 45-49 are lonelier than those 70 years and older according to our research (43% vs. 25%, respectively). In fact, older people are happier than younger folks. In our recent happiness research, people experienced their lowest levels of happiness in their early 50s, and their happiness steadily increased with age.
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Psychiatrists have long acknowledged that anger and irritability are classic symptoms of major depression in teens and children, but for some reason, prolonged adult crabbiness has been generally ignored.
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Sure, those grandbabies are cute, but a close bond with your adult grandchildren can help reduce depression for both of you - and the closer the bond, the more antidepression benefits there are, a new study finds.
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My husband knows not to talk to me before I have my first cup of coffee in the morning. Maybe not even until after the third.
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Today, when we're feeling in need of advice or reassurance about our inner woes, we're accustomed to turning on the TV and watching someone such as psychologist Phil McGraw or physician and addiction expert Drew Pinsky elicit epiphanies from troubled people right in front of the camera, and in the process dispense advice to millions. But it was Joyce Brothers, who died on May 13 at age 85 in Fort Lee, N.J., who invented the role of the TV psychologist in the 1950s and first got us to trust in a celebrity mental health expert.
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