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In addition to advocating for older Americans in the halls of Congress, AARP staff and volunteers are working on the ground in all 50 states, Washington, DC, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to make a difference in people’s lives through advocacy. This year, we have helped enact state policies to support more than 30 million family caregivers and provide thousands of workers with a new way to save for retirement.
En español | Today, AARP endorsed new legislation that would hold drug companies more accountable for their pricing decisions. Thank you to Sens. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.) for introducing the bipartisan FAIR Drug Pricing Act of 2016 calling on drug companies to be more transparent in how they price their products.
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En español | Think for a moment how busy and chaotic everyday life can be: juggling careers, kids, finances and more. Now imagine also caring for a parent, spouse or child with a disability, maybe even around the clock. Every day about 40 million Americans — myself included — care for our loved ones so they can live independently at home and in their communities, where they want to be.
The story of David and Goliath is usually told when someone who is facing daunting odds and isn’t supposed to win does just that — wins.
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Whom do you turn to when you need advice on managing your personal finances? A family member? A close friend? Or do you have a financial planner on speed dial? When there is mention of a financial planner, people often think it’s a service for the wealthy. It’s time to debunk that myth. Financial planners are not only for those with lots of money, they are for anyone needing to get financial matters in order. If you don’t think it’s true, check out one of the free Financial Planning Days events happening in your city from Oct. 3 through Nov. 7.
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Poet and civil rights leader Maya Angelou once said, “Perhaps travel cannot prevent bigotry, but by demonstrating that all peoples cry, laugh, eat, worry, and die, it can introduce the idea that if we try and understand each other, we may even become friends.”
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I once had a dirty little secret. No, it wasn’t an online flirtation, a crush on actor Mark Rylance (that’s common knowledge) or a tendency for midnight fridge raids. It was a brief problem with BPSD, aka Binge-and-Purge Shopping Disorder, and it’s why online retailers such as Amazon, Target, Sephora and Beauty.com are such a success.
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We heard through the grapevine about a boomer couple upset because their son, who graduated from a prestigious college and professional school without loans, was marrying a young lawyer with tens of thousands in educational debt. The parents feared that paying off this financial burden would delay the couple in buying a house and starting a family. Wisely, they chose to say nothing.
"Don't Worry, It Gets Worse: One Twentysomething's (Mostly Failed) Attempts at Adulthood."
They’re back! With costly college diploma in hand, thousands of 20-somethings have returned to the nest. Some will be starting jobs, while others ponder their next move. No matter which category, odds are most parents will provide some financial support to their adult child for a year or two — or more. A recent Upromise Sallie Mae poll found that 65 percent of parents expect to support their children for up to five years after college graduation, including those with jobs.
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Updated May 4, 2015
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