Join us for three days of movies, concerts, book talks, celebrity conversations and other virtual events.
A woman listening to something with headphones on
Music’s effects are remarkable, no matter what type of music you enjoy listening to or performing, according to research.
A close-up view of a man playing a guitar
A willingness to try new things, whether it’s making music, taking language lessons or tackling new puzzles and books, is a key to healthy aging.
A woman listening to something with headphones on
Music can spark emotions like joy. But how and why our brains create this emotional response is a matter of scientific debate.
A happy woman putting a piece of chocolate in a man’s mouth
Lose weight, exercise, stop eating Twinkies — good health can be such a chore. But indulging in these four guilty pleasures may be good for us.
Various music notes on a blue background
Making and enjoying music can stimulate your brain, trigger memories and emotions, connect you with others, and enrich your life, according to a report.
A woman with headphones on lying on the couch
Ever get chills listening to your favorite music? There’s a word for those chills and lots of people experience them when songs waft through your ears.
Couple driving in red convertible
Remember those lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer with the top down—or at least the windows open — and Top 40 blasting from the radio.
620-ben-e-king
R&B singer Ben E. King, who passed away April 30 at age 76 in Hackensack, N.J., had a smooth, unaffected baritone and soulful delivery that earned him a string of top 10 singles between the late 1950s and early 1960s, both as a member of the Drifters and as a solo artist.
Spin class
What’s good for your body is not necessarily good for your ears. Loud music is an integral part of many workout activities — spin classes are a prime example. A recent article in the New York Times found that the noise levels in a spin class at Crunch averaged 100 decibels over 40 minutes, and hit…
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