neighborhood

Couple waking into grocery store
You like where you live. Your community is the perfect fit, you say.
GovernorsIslandSkyline
One of my very best friends died three years ago. He happened to be my grandfather, who was 96 years old. He  was ready. It was time.
740-new-orleans-katrina-2005
Ten years ago, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, AARP had to cancel our Life@50+ national conference in New Orleans.
agefriendly-Taipei2
As we pedaled along, it was as if we shared a bike path with the whole city.
monopoly_houses
Imagine that you've lived in the same neighborhood for most of your life. Your friends, your family, your personal history are all rooted there.
Night Baseball Washington Nationals by Gary Graves (creative commons license)
I am a lifelong baseball fan. I grew up going with my dad to Yankees Stadium and watching Whitey Ford throw fastballs. Decades later, when the Montreal Expos brought baseball back to Washington, D.C., and became the Nationals, I threw my support behind them. And even though my Nats didn't live up to the media hype of this season, I'll be with them through thick and thin.
Dan_and_Lys_renovationsAugust 13
In earlier blog posts, I've addressed the idea of retiring in the neighborhood you've come to love, the one where you have established friendships and social circles. But what if your quest is to go someplace new, in the same town or even far away? My wife, Lys, and I moved more than 3,000 miles, leaving Florida for the cooler climate of the Pacific Northwest. We wanted to be in the center of innovative town making, a place where we could live comfortably without a car and grow our own food almost year-round.
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