newspapers

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There are two schools of thought about USA Today founder Al Neuharth, who died on April 19 at age 89 in Cocoa Beach, Fla. Some think he helped ruin the newspaper, an institution older than our country itself, by turning it into a paper-and-ink imitation of TV news. Others think he helped modernized a desperately outdated medium and, in so doing, perhaps staved off its demise.
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Comic strip "Funky Winkerbean," created by Tom Batiuk, is celebrating a profitable 40-year-run in American newspapers. The strip debuted in 1972, featuring Funky, Les and other high-school age characters. But as Batiuk got older, he decided to let the characters age along with him. And like Batiuk and other boomers, they began dealing with adult problems, too.
Here's an article worth reading today from USAToday.com on a recent Pew study about how much time consumers are spending on news these days. (The fact that I got this story perusing USA Today's website just furthers the point of the study!)
With the Senate holding hearings on the future of newspapers, are we witnessing the end of an era?
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